Tom Baron

Thomas BARONAge: 76 years18631940

Name
Thomas BARON
Given names
Thomas
Surname
BARON

Tom BARON

Name
Tom BARON
Given names
Tom
Surname
BARON
Birth 21 December 1863 19
Residence 2 April 1871 (Age 7 years)
Note: Living with his uncle Richard Baron at this address at 1871 census.
Inscription
Family Bible
25 December 1880 (Age 17 years)

Family Bible Inscription
Family Bible Inscription

Note:
Inside the cover of his family bible Thomas has written: Tom Baron Junr. North Frodingham December 25th 1880 Blessed Lord who has caused all Holy Scriptures to be written for our learning grant that I may in such wise read, mark learn and inwardly digest that by patience and comfort of thy Holy word I may forever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life which thou hast given us through thy dear son Jesus Christ. Tom Baron Junr.

MarriageVioletta HOPEView this family
22 October 1884 (Age 20 years)
Occupation
Groom
22 October 1884 (Age 20 years)

Note: Occupation at marriage
Occupation
Groom And Gardener
3 July 1885 (Age 21 years)
Note: Occupation at birth of Arthur
Occupation
Domestic Servant, Coachman & Gardener
6 April 1891 (Age 27 years)

Note: Occupation at census
Residence 6 April 1891 (Age 27 years)
Note: Address at census
Occupation
Coachman Domestic
9 July 1895 (Age 31 years)

Note: Occupation on James Harold's Birth Certificate
Residence 9 July 1895 (Age 31 years)
Note: Address on James Harold's Birth Certificate
Portrait
Thomas Baron and Family
1900 (Age 36 years)

Occupation
Gardener (not domestic)
31 March 1901 (Age 37 years)

Note: Occupation at 1901 Census
New Spa Theatre
New Spa Theatre

Note: This Display would have been Tom Baron's work.

Residence 31 March 1901 (Age 37 years)
Note: Address at 1901 Census
Portrait
Thomas Baron And Family
1905 (Age 41 years)

Thomas Baron and Family 1905
Thomas Baron and Family 1905

Note: This photo was taken in the New Spa. From bottom left clockwise around Tom and wife Violetta are Annie, Arthur, Edith, James Harold, Florence, Thomas Ernest and Violetta.

Newspaper Report
Great Fire At The New Spa
20 October 1906 (Age 42 years)

Note:
Transcription of a report in the Bridlington Free Press of 26 October 1906:- GREAT FIRE AT THE NEW SPA, BRIDLINGTON GRAND HALL BURNED DOWN Estimated Damage £4,500 FIRE BRIGADES GOOD WORK On Saturday evening, about nine o' clock, the town was startled by the explosion of two bombs in the neighbourhood of the Corporation fire-station, and the almost simultaneous buzzing of the buzzer on the top of the Corporation electricity works. It was the signal for the fire brigade to turn out, and they turned out in double quick time. The bombs went at 9-25 and by 9-35 the fire engine had started out and was making for the scene of the fire. The Grand Hall of the New Spa and Gardens was ablaze, and the reflection could be seen in the sky for considerable distances. In fact the buzzer was distinctly heard at the village of Hunmanby. The annual fair was in progress at the Old Town on Saturday evening, and even that attraction "paled its ineffectual fires," as it were, before the regrettably grand illumination of the sea front on the south side of the town. A large travelling menagerie was on the same evening exhibiting its long catalogue of animals on the Recreation Ground. A rumour got about in parts of the Old Town that it was the menagerie that was ablaze; and there were visions of lion and tiger hunts along the fields where of old the townspeople used to shelter their cattle under the wing of the monks, from the robbers and the wild beasts of a former day. Soon al steps were towards the New Spa, and many were the feelings of regret expressed as the flames were seen to envelope the hall, and consume everything within it. How the fire originated is a complete mystery, and it will probably continue to remain a mystery. At about two o' clock in the afternoonthe manage and secretary of the New Spa Company, Mr Hy Hague, was at the Spa, and left the building safe and secure. Later Mr Baron, the gardener, was in the grounds, and had occasion to go several times round the outside of the hall. He left at at 4-30, and then there was no one in the grounds, and everything appeared all right. About 8-45, however, a young lady living in Marine Drive noticed smoke rising from the grounds of the Spa, and called attention to the unusual circumstance, for she was aware that the gardens and grounds had closed for the season a fortnight previously. Two lads about the same time NOTICED THE SMOKE, and one of them ran to the gardener's (Mr Baron's) house and aquainted him of his surmise. MrEwart, one of the Spa attendants, was also notified. Mr Baron and Mr Ewart made straight for the grounds, and the former despatched a message to Captain G Rennard of the Brunswick Hotel. Mr Rennard, accompanied by a number of fishermen, lost no time in getting out the light hose cart and in reaching the Spa. The hose was attached to a street hydrant, and a jet of water was sent into the flames; but it was of small account, and the steam fire engine was called for. When it arrived the fire was shooting high into the sky. There was no time lost in getting to work, and Captain Rennard wisely concentrated his efforts on saving the pavilion and adjoining properties. The hall was a mass of flames, and the intense heat could be gauged by the manner in which when the roof collapsed the large girders and uprights were twisted and broken. Within an hour and a half of the outbreak, the hall, converted into a veritable retort, was gutted, and nothing in it or about it could be saved. There was an immense crowd on the New Spa and along the South Cliff, where a full view of the consuming conflagration could be had, and on the piers there must have been thousands of spectators. Shortly after midnight one of the large pillars CRASHED THROUGH THE SOUTH EASTERN WALL of the building, but happily no one was injured; and the good fortune characterised all the operations of the brigade and its helpers, which included several of the men of the local Coastguard station. The brigades objective was, as we have stated, to confine the fire to the Grand Hall, and with this object in view their attention was fixed on keeping up the brick partition between the hall and the pavilion. There was a plentiful supply of water, and this object was accomplished, though in the process some damage was done to the glass roof of the pavilion. The engine and brigade, with Captain Rennard in charge, remained on the scene all night, the engine returning to the station shortly after seven o' clock on Sunday morning. a contingent of the men of the brigade, however, remained, and as late as 4-30 on Sunday afternoon were engaged in coping with the smouldering ruins. Large crowds visited the Spa on Sunday - and an enterprising management restricted the dimensions of the crowd and ensured order by by imposing on the eager sightseers a small emtry charge to the grounds. The scene was one of desolation, the Grand Hall having been completely destroyed, only its charred and ruined brick walls remaining. There were many willing helpers - too many, alas! - and the smashed plate glass windows of the pretty bandstand, and the damaged seats and doors testified to the fact. It seems clear indeed that SOMETHING LIKE A PANIC had taken possession of the minds of the men - including one or two public men - for instructions, it is said, were given by those not authorised to give instructions to clear the pavilion; and this was accomplished in a most reckless way, many pounds worth of damage resulting. One poor fellow rushed into the bandstand, and proceeded to serve the Company by smashing the large plate glass panes, and asked while he belaboured the windows with a heavy weapon what he was doing, he replied that the fire was coming, and he was "saving the bandstand." He had to be hauled out of the bandstand. Another "helper" would insist on passing through the doorway leading from the pavilion past the Grand Hall, though he could have scarcely accomplished the feat without being converted into a cinder in the doing of it. he had to be dragged back from his mad resolution, protesting all the while. As we have said the origin of the fire is not traceable. It is known that the smoke in the beginning came from the vicinity of the stage, and that the scenery and fittings under the stage and near to the south-eastern side entrance were the first to be destroyed. In a word there is a suspicion that the fire has been the work of an incendiary. The total damage is estimated at between £4000 and £5000, and is covered by insurance. In addition to the Grand Hall a number of greenhouses were destroyed or seriously damaged by the fire or water; and we understand that Mr Baron has lost plants, his own personal property to the value of about £20. It is not unlikely that on the site of the Grand Pavilion there will be erected in good time for next year's early season, an up to date theatre and opera house. A word of praise is due to the firemen and the hon. captain of the brigade for the prompt manner in which they turned out in answer to the summons, and afterwards discharged their onerous duties. It transpires that one of the firemen had a narrow escape from a bad fall. He stepped onto the roof of the pavilion, and the thick glass gave way under him. He fell almost through, but was able to retain hold of one of the beams, and was assisted up again within a few minutes. Another of the firemen had the misfortune to have his hand badly cut. A SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCE Interviewed by one of our reporters, Mr Baron, gardener, said it was true that though he had left the building secure at 4-30 on Saturday afternoon, when he retuned on the fire alarm being given he found the side stage door open. The door had been secure when he left the grounds; and he did not believe it possible that the fire could have forced it open by the time he returned. It had been padlocked. The stage scenery lay in front of the door under the stage, and the scenery was all right when he arrived about 8-45. The door opened outwards. Hs conclusion was that someone had forced open the stage door and entered the building. THE YACHT CLUB At one time the the Yorkshire Yacht Club seemed to be in considerable danger. Flames were shooting up through the coal hole nearly opposite the Club, and spreading over the footpath. The wind at that time was blowing directly over the Club House, and the heat was so intense that it was found impossible to stand on the balcony. The secretary of the Club, Mr Shackles, was on the premises at the time, and he and the attendant were for a time busily engaged in carrying buckets of water, and in assisting in the attempt to subdue the flames. The Club House and Club property ahs been considerably damaged. The wooden pallisading has been badly scorched, and the shrubs and plants wre in many cases ruined. Several of the panes of glass in the upper portion of the Club House have been cracked with the intense heat. It would surely have fared worse had not the wind veered round to the south after ten o' clock, and had not the fire brigade been so promptly on the sceneand done an excellent service. THE LIFEBOAT HOUSE It is not the case that the brigade had to play upon the lifeboat house or any ofthe property in Marine Drive, though this would probably have been necessary had not rain been falling heavily at the time. As it was, the lifeboat house was damaged to some extent, every pane of coloured glass over the heavy doors having been broken by the intense heat.
Newspaper Report
Alarming Fire At The New Spa
20 October 1906 (Age 42 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in the Bridlington Chronicle:- «b»Alarming Fire At The New Spa «/b»Grand Hall Completely Destroyed«b» «/b» ESTIMATED DAMAGE £5000 About nine o' clock on Saturday night Bridlington was startled by the explosion of bombs followed by the sounding of the alarm at the Electricity Works, announcing an outbreak of fire. Instantly the town was in state of wild excitment. At the High Green, were the annual autumn fair was in full swing, people were congregated in large numbers, but above the noise and confusion of organs and French pianos, the clanging of bells, and the shrieking of steam whistles, the sound of the fire bombs wre distinctly heard. The effect was marvellous. In a few seconds there was a general rush in the direction of the Fire Station, and the showmen and stallholders were left in comparative quiet HOW THE NEWS WAS RECEIVED Rapidly the news spread throughout the town that the New Spa Theatre was on fire. This grave news proved to be only too real. People rushed from all directions, many of them leaving places of amusementsuch as Bostock's Show, the Grand Pavilion and he Peoples Palace, and as they made their way in the direction of the New Spa the red glow of fire, overshadowed by a dense volume of smoke, gave ample evidence of the serious nature of the fire, and it seemed the work of but a few moments ere the sky was illuminated by a gigantic blaze, whilst thick showers of sparks were carried inland by the southerly wind, and fell in the streets and on the house tops in all directions. At Hilderthorpe and the Quay, the news created the most intense excitement, and for a while business was practically at a standstill. The markt was almost deserted, and a wild rush was made in the direction of the Spa. Those who were earliest on the scene realised only too well that the theatre was doomed. Already an ominous red flare was seen through the windows, and thick smoke was issuing from the roof. Every moment the fire seemed to increase in volume. Meanwhile Captain Rennard was early on the scene, and with the assistance of many willing hands, a hose was attached to the hydrant in Marine Drive. Leaving capable men in charge of the water-hose already attached, the Captain of the Brigade rode off to the Fire Station. The fire rockets followed each other in rapid succession, and it is to the credit of the Brigade to state that within a few minutes of the reports every man was at his post. The hose-cart followed by the steam fire engine, galloped over Station Bridge and very soon they got to work fron the water main in West Street. Two connections were secured, and the pipes carried past the Yacht Club to the scene of the fire. NOTHING COULD SAVE THE THEATRE It was soon found that nothing could save the theatre. The dense crowds of people packed of the Spa Promenade, and at every available point of vantage, watched with keen anxiety the rapid work of destruction. Presently, with a terrific crash, the entire roof of the theatre fell in. Flames and showers of red sparks told of the fierceness of the fire within the four walls of the large theatre. The iron columns supporting long iron girders across the entire building were left standing, enveloped in the red glow and blaze of the burning wood work. The heat was fierce in the extreme, and the scene as one glanced away from at the eager faces of the thousands of onlookers was one which will be long remembered. The Fire Brigade wisely turned its attention to the work of cutting off the fire at the north end. At one time it seemed that not even the stout brick wall could retard the onrush oof the flames. The heavy ornamental ironwork fixed on the summit of the wall was seen for a short time envloped in flames, finally to fall over and mingle with the ruins beneath. By determined and well directed efforts on the part of the Brigade, the full force of water was brought to bear upon the end of the theatre adjoining the large Glass Dame (sic), wherein is the fine bandstand surrounded on one side with lock up shops and on the other by the Spa Cafe, manager's offices &c. It was some time before the fierceness of the flames abated, but at length the crowd had the satisfaction of seeing that at any rate the buildings adjoining the theatre would be saved, and this was due entirely to the efforts of the Brigade. The roar of the flames, the noise of falling timber, the crash of heavy columns and girders, mingled with the hissing and crackling caused by the constant stream of water continued for a long ime. The fire burned in a fierce red glow beneath suspended iron girders bent out of recognition by the intense heat. In the light could be seen only the skeleton of the former building. Windows and window frames, doors and porticos were either totally or partially demolished. For some time the ponderous steel columns stood erect amidst the mass of flames, but presently these fell with a mighty crash on the front side nearest the stage, carrying with it a large portion of the well (sic). At the back of the theatre the staircase entrance leading from Marine Drive was threatened with total destruction, but the flames were eventually overcome. The fire played havoc with the glass-houses under the care of Mr T Baron, (head gardener at the Spa). There the work of destruction is very extensive, for hundreds of plants of every description were completely destroyed, these including some splendid palms and ferns, annd innumerable geranium plants and other varieties which had been stored away for the winter. THE FIRST NEWS OF THE FIRE One of the first on the scene of the fire was Mr T Baron, the head gardener. His residence is in Horsforth Avenue, a short distance from the New Spa. On Saturday night at about a quarter to nine a boy rushed into Mr Baron's shopsaying that he had seen smoke coming from the theatre. Mr Baron immediately ran down to the Spa, and when he reached the theatre he saw that the place was on fire at the stage end.One of the first things he noticed was that the stage door was standing wide open, and the fire seemed to be among the scenery around the stage. He instantly closed the door, in order to check the progress of the fire by stopping the draught. He then went round and turned the gas off in the meter-house, and also turned the water on at full pressure from the main. In the meantime he had sent the boy to call the Captain of the Fire Brigade (Councillor Rennard), but the telephone from the Yacht Club had already apprised him of the fire, and he was immediately on the scene. The manager of the New Spa (Mr Henry Hague) was also quickly on the scene, but was powerless to avert the terrible work of destruction. THE SCENE ON SUNDAY From all parts of the town and neighbourhood hundreds of sightseers flocked to the scene of the fire on Sunday. The flames had been extinguished and the spectacle which met the eye can only be described as a scene of complete wreckage. Masses of charred wood were piled up in shapeless confusion, with girders and pillars lying about just where they had fallen. These charred heaps contained the ashes of hundreds of chairs, the flooring, beams, and framework of the balconies - in a word, the complete interior of the building was one mass of ruin. There was not a vestage of window left in the whole place, and the splintering of the stone work around the windows testified to the terrific heat. The stage end of the theatre is completely destroyed and only the mere skeletons of the front and back walls remain standing. At the north end the substantial brick wall stands intact. Never before has there been seen such a terrible blaze in Bridlington, and perhaps never has the work of destruction been so rapid.

Occupation
Greengrocer
1913 (Age 49 years)

Note: At 3 Horsforth Avenue, 4 Bridge Street and with nurseries at Cardigan Road, Bridlington noted in Kelly's Directory of N & E Ridings of Yorkshire, 1913. [Part 1: Localities, Court & Trade Directories].
Occupation
Gardener
12 May 1915 (Age 51 years)

Note: Occupation at James Harold's marriage
Occupation
Head Gardener
1915 (Age 51 years)

Note:
Transcript of extracts from "I Remember, Reminiscences Of Old Bridlington" By S. Gawthorp:- The New Spa was built in 1896 by Whittaker Bros. of Horsforth......the Spa ..... was then owned by the New Spa and Gardens Company Limited. Up Piercy Lane was Tom Baron's market garden. Tom Baron was the first gardener of the Spa Gardens, which extended much further than they do now, and had little walks and alcoves with seats. On gala nights these used to be hung with candles in little coloured glass pots.

Residence 1915 (Age 51 years)
Note: Address on 1915 Voters List. The list also records that he has a shop at 4 Bridge Street, Bridington.
Occupation
Fruiterer And Florist
1919 (Age 55 years)

Note: Kelly's Directory 1919
Portrait
Thomas Baron C1920
1920 (Age 56 years)

Leisure
Children's Picnic
1928 (Age 64 years)

Note: Taken in about 1928. Tom Baron is on the right holding the white jug. The two girls on the bench looking towards the camera are Nancy Smith (daughter of Florence Smith nee Baron) and Florence Joyce Baron (known as Betty) illegitimate daughter of Annie Garrett nee Baron. There are probably more of Tom's grandchildren on the bench but we can't see their faces.
Portrait
Thomas and Violetta C1930
1930 (Age 66 years)

Golden Wedding 22 October 1934 (Age 70 years)

Note: On 22 October 1934 Thomas and Violetta would have celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary. The photograph would have been taken around that time.
Inscription
Family Bible
18 May 1935 (Age 71 years)

Note: Tom annotates these two pages to show that they are leaves from the "old Family Bible".

Portrait
Thomas, Florence and Violetta C.1936
1936 (Age 72 years)

Award
Long Service Certificate
12 March 1939 (Age 75 years)

Long Service Certificate
Long Service Certificate

Note: Methodist Church: Sunday School Department Long Service Certificate for 55 years service.

Occupation
Gardner (retired)
29 September 1939 (Age 75 years)

Note: Occupation on 1939 Register
Residence 29 September 1939 (Age 75 years)
Note: Address on 1939 Register
Death 8 January 1940 (Age 76 years)
Unique identifier
FB81B1812CB04FD1A517ED309459B292B421
yes

Last change 20 January 201715:41

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage:
himself
Family with Violetta HOPE - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 22 October 1884The Parish Church, Nafferton, East Yorkshire, England
8 months
son
2 years
daughter
2 years
son
2 years
daughter
3 years
son
3 years
daughter
2 years
daughter

Residence
Living with his uncle Richard Baron at this address at 1871 census.
Occupation
Occupation at marriage
Occupation
Occupation at birth of Arthur
Occupation
Occupation at census
Residence
Address at census
Occupation
Occupation on James Harold's Birth Certificate
Residence
Address on James Harold's Birth Certificate
Occupation
Occupation at 1901 Census
Residence
Address at 1901 Census
Newspaper Report
Transcription of a report in the Bridlington Free Press of 26 October 1906:- GREAT FIRE AT THE NEW SPA, BRIDLINGTON GRAND HALL BURNED DOWN Estimated Damage £4,500 FIRE BRIGADES GOOD WORK On Saturday evening, about nine o' clock, the town was startled by the explosion of two bombs in the neighbourhood of the Corporation fire-station, and the almost simultaneous buzzing of the buzzer on the top of the Corporation electricity works. It was the signal for the fire brigade to turn out, and they turned out in double quick time. The bombs went at 9-25 and by 9-35 the fire engine had started out and was making for the scene of the fire. The Grand Hall of the New Spa and Gardens was ablaze, and the reflection could be seen in the sky for considerable distances. In fact the buzzer was distinctly heard at the village of Hunmanby. The annual fair was in progress at the Old Town on Saturday evening, and even that attraction "paled its ineffectual fires," as it were, before the regrettably grand illumination of the sea front on the south side of the town. A large travelling menagerie was on the same evening exhibiting its long catalogue of animals on the Recreation Ground. A rumour got about in parts of the Old Town that it was the menagerie that was ablaze; and there were visions of lion and tiger hunts along the fields where of old the townspeople used to shelter their cattle under the wing of the monks, from the robbers and the wild beasts of a former day. Soon al steps were towards the New Spa, and many were the feelings of regret expressed as the flames were seen to envelope the hall, and consume everything within it. How the fire originated is a complete mystery, and it will probably continue to remain a mystery. At about two o' clock in the afternoonthe manage and secretary of the New Spa Company, Mr Hy Hague, was at the Spa, and left the building safe and secure. Later Mr Baron, the gardener, was in the grounds, and had occasion to go several times round the outside of the hall. He left at at 4-30, and then there was no one in the grounds, and everything appeared all right. About 8-45, however, a young lady living in Marine Drive noticed smoke rising from the grounds of the Spa, and called attention to the unusual circumstance, for she was aware that the gardens and grounds had closed for the season a fortnight previously. Two lads about the same time NOTICED THE SMOKE, and one of them ran to the gardener's (Mr Baron's) house and aquainted him of his surmise. MrEwart, one of the Spa attendants, was also notified. Mr Baron and Mr Ewart made straight for the grounds, and the former despatched a message to Captain G Rennard of the Brunswick Hotel. Mr Rennard, accompanied by a number of fishermen, lost no time in getting out the light hose cart and in reaching the Spa. The hose was attached to a street hydrant, and a jet of water was sent into the flames; but it was of small account, and the steam fire engine was called for. When it arrived the fire was shooting high into the sky. There was no time lost in getting to work, and Captain Rennard wisely concentrated his efforts on saving the pavilion and adjoining properties. The hall was a mass of flames, and the intense heat could be gauged by the manner in which when the roof collapsed the large girders and uprights were twisted and broken. Within an hour and a half of the outbreak, the hall, converted into a veritable retort, was gutted, and nothing in it or about it could be saved. There was an immense crowd on the New Spa and along the South Cliff, where a full view of the consuming conflagration could be had, and on the piers there must have been thousands of spectators. Shortly after midnight one of the large pillars CRASHED THROUGH THE SOUTH EASTERN WALL of the building, but happily no one was injured; and the good fortune characterised all the operations of the brigade and its helpers, which included several of the men of the local Coastguard station. The brigades objective was, as we have stated, to confine the fire to the Grand Hall, and with this object in view their attention was fixed on keeping up the brick partition between the hall and the pavilion. There was a plentiful supply of water, and this object was accomplished, though in the process some damage was done to the glass roof of the pavilion. The engine and brigade, with Captain Rennard in charge, remained on the scene all night, the engine returning to the station shortly after seven o' clock on Sunday morning. a contingent of the men of the brigade, however, remained, and as late as 4-30 on Sunday afternoon were engaged in coping with the smouldering ruins. Large crowds visited the Spa on Sunday - and an enterprising management restricted the dimensions of the crowd and ensured order by by imposing on the eager sightseers a small emtry charge to the grounds. The scene was one of desolation, the Grand Hall having been completely destroyed, only its charred and ruined brick walls remaining. There were many willing helpers - too many, alas! - and the smashed plate glass windows of the pretty bandstand, and the damaged seats and doors testified to the fact. It seems clear indeed that SOMETHING LIKE A PANIC had taken possession of the minds of the men - including one or two public men - for instructions, it is said, were given by those not authorised to give instructions to clear the pavilion; and this was accomplished in a most reckless way, many pounds worth of damage resulting. One poor fellow rushed into the bandstand, and proceeded to serve the Company by smashing the large plate glass panes, and asked while he belaboured the windows with a heavy weapon what he was doing, he replied that the fire was coming, and he was "saving the bandstand." He had to be hauled out of the bandstand. Another "helper" would insist on passing through the doorway leading from the pavilion past the Grand Hall, though he could have scarcely accomplished the feat without being converted into a cinder in the doing of it. he had to be dragged back from his mad resolution, protesting all the while. As we have said the origin of the fire is not traceable. It is known that the smoke in the beginning came from the vicinity of the stage, and that the scenery and fittings under the stage and near to the south-eastern side entrance were the first to be destroyed. In a word there is a suspicion that the fire has been the work of an incendiary. The total damage is estimated at between £4000 and £5000, and is covered by insurance. In addition to the Grand Hall a number of greenhouses were destroyed or seriously damaged by the fire or water; and we understand that Mr Baron has lost plants, his own personal property to the value of about £20. It is not unlikely that on the site of the Grand Pavilion there will be erected in good time for next year's early season, an up to date theatre and opera house. A word of praise is due to the firemen and the hon. captain of the brigade for the prompt manner in which they turned out in answer to the summons, and afterwards discharged their onerous duties. It transpires that one of the firemen had a narrow escape from a bad fall. He stepped onto the roof of the pavilion, and the thick glass gave way under him. He fell almost through, but was able to retain hold of one of the beams, and was assisted up again within a few minutes. Another of the firemen had the misfortune to have his hand badly cut. A SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCE Interviewed by one of our reporters, Mr Baron, gardener, said it was true that though he had left the building secure at 4-30 on Saturday afternoon, when he retuned on the fire alarm being given he found the side stage door open. The door had been secure when he left the grounds; and he did not believe it possible that the fire could have forced it open by the time he returned. It had been padlocked. The stage scenery lay in front of the door under the stage, and the scenery was all right when he arrived about 8-45. The door opened outwards. Hs conclusion was that someone had forced open the stage door and entered the building. THE YACHT CLUB At one time the the Yorkshire Yacht Club seemed to be in considerable danger. Flames were shooting up through the coal hole nearly opposite the Club, and spreading over the footpath. The wind at that time was blowing directly over the Club House, and the heat was so intense that it was found impossible to stand on the balcony. The secretary of the Club, Mr Shackles, was on the premises at the time, and he and the attendant were for a time busily engaged in carrying buckets of water, and in assisting in the attempt to subdue the flames. The Club House and Club property ahs been considerably damaged. The wooden pallisading has been badly scorched, and the shrubs and plants wre in many cases ruined. Several of the panes of glass in the upper portion of the Club House have been cracked with the intense heat. It would surely have fared worse had not the wind veered round to the south after ten o' clock, and had not the fire brigade been so promptly on the sceneand done an excellent service. THE LIFEBOAT HOUSE It is not the case that the brigade had to play upon the lifeboat house or any ofthe property in Marine Drive, though this would probably have been necessary had not rain been falling heavily at the time. As it was, the lifeboat house was damaged to some extent, every pane of coloured glass over the heavy doors having been broken by the intense heat.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in the Bridlington Chronicle:- «b»Alarming Fire At The New Spa «/b»Grand Hall Completely Destroyed«b» «/b» ESTIMATED DAMAGE £5000 About nine o' clock on Saturday night Bridlington was startled by the explosion of bombs followed by the sounding of the alarm at the Electricity Works, announcing an outbreak of fire. Instantly the town was in state of wild excitment. At the High Green, were the annual autumn fair was in full swing, people were congregated in large numbers, but above the noise and confusion of organs and French pianos, the clanging of bells, and the shrieking of steam whistles, the sound of the fire bombs wre distinctly heard. The effect was marvellous. In a few seconds there was a general rush in the direction of the Fire Station, and the showmen and stallholders were left in comparative quiet HOW THE NEWS WAS RECEIVED Rapidly the news spread throughout the town that the New Spa Theatre was on fire. This grave news proved to be only too real. People rushed from all directions, many of them leaving places of amusementsuch as Bostock's Show, the Grand Pavilion and he Peoples Palace, and as they made their way in the direction of the New Spa the red glow of fire, overshadowed by a dense volume of smoke, gave ample evidence of the serious nature of the fire, and it seemed the work of but a few moments ere the sky was illuminated by a gigantic blaze, whilst thick showers of sparks were carried inland by the southerly wind, and fell in the streets and on the house tops in all directions. At Hilderthorpe and the Quay, the news created the most intense excitement, and for a while business was practically at a standstill. The markt was almost deserted, and a wild rush was made in the direction of the Spa. Those who were earliest on the scene realised only too well that the theatre was doomed. Already an ominous red flare was seen through the windows, and thick smoke was issuing from the roof. Every moment the fire seemed to increase in volume. Meanwhile Captain Rennard was early on the scene, and with the assistance of many willing hands, a hose was attached to the hydrant in Marine Drive. Leaving capable men in charge of the water-hose already attached, the Captain of the Brigade rode off to the Fire Station. The fire rockets followed each other in rapid succession, and it is to the credit of the Brigade to state that within a few minutes of the reports every man was at his post. The hose-cart followed by the steam fire engine, galloped over Station Bridge and very soon they got to work fron the water main in West Street. Two connections were secured, and the pipes carried past the Yacht Club to the scene of the fire. NOTHING COULD SAVE THE THEATRE It was soon found that nothing could save the theatre. The dense crowds of people packed of the Spa Promenade, and at every available point of vantage, watched with keen anxiety the rapid work of destruction. Presently, with a terrific crash, the entire roof of the theatre fell in. Flames and showers of red sparks told of the fierceness of the fire within the four walls of the large theatre. The iron columns supporting long iron girders across the entire building were left standing, enveloped in the red glow and blaze of the burning wood work. The heat was fierce in the extreme, and the scene as one glanced away from at the eager faces of the thousands of onlookers was one which will be long remembered. The Fire Brigade wisely turned its attention to the work of cutting off the fire at the north end. At one time it seemed that not even the stout brick wall could retard the onrush oof the flames. The heavy ornamental ironwork fixed on the summit of the wall was seen for a short time envloped in flames, finally to fall over and mingle with the ruins beneath. By determined and well directed efforts on the part of the Brigade, the full force of water was brought to bear upon the end of the theatre adjoining the large Glass Dame (sic), wherein is the fine bandstand surrounded on one side with lock up shops and on the other by the Spa Cafe, manager's offices &c. It was some time before the fierceness of the flames abated, but at length the crowd had the satisfaction of seeing that at any rate the buildings adjoining the theatre would be saved, and this was due entirely to the efforts of the Brigade. The roar of the flames, the noise of falling timber, the crash of heavy columns and girders, mingled with the hissing and crackling caused by the constant stream of water continued for a long ime. The fire burned in a fierce red glow beneath suspended iron girders bent out of recognition by the intense heat. In the light could be seen only the skeleton of the former building. Windows and window frames, doors and porticos were either totally or partially demolished. For some time the ponderous steel columns stood erect amidst the mass of flames, but presently these fell with a mighty crash on the front side nearest the stage, carrying with it a large portion of the well (sic). At the back of the theatre the staircase entrance leading from Marine Drive was threatened with total destruction, but the flames were eventually overcome. The fire played havoc with the glass-houses under the care of Mr T Baron, (head gardener at the Spa). There the work of destruction is very extensive, for hundreds of plants of every description were completely destroyed, these including some splendid palms and ferns, annd innumerable geranium plants and other varieties which had been stored away for the winter. THE FIRST NEWS OF THE FIRE One of the first on the scene of the fire was Mr T Baron, the head gardener. His residence is in Horsforth Avenue, a short distance from the New Spa. On Saturday night at about a quarter to nine a boy rushed into Mr Baron's shopsaying that he had seen smoke coming from the theatre. Mr Baron immediately ran down to the Spa, and when he reached the theatre he saw that the place was on fire at the stage end.One of the first things he noticed was that the stage door was standing wide open, and the fire seemed to be among the scenery around the stage. He instantly closed the door, in order to check the progress of the fire by stopping the draught. He then went round and turned the gas off in the meter-house, and also turned the water on at full pressure from the main. In the meantime he had sent the boy to call the Captain of the Fire Brigade (Councillor Rennard), but the telephone from the Yacht Club had already apprised him of the fire, and he was immediately on the scene. The manager of the New Spa (Mr Henry Hague) was also quickly on the scene, but was powerless to avert the terrible work of destruction. THE SCENE ON SUNDAY From all parts of the town and neighbourhood hundreds of sightseers flocked to the scene of the fire on Sunday. The flames had been extinguished and the spectacle which met the eye can only be described as a scene of complete wreckage. Masses of charred wood were piled up in shapeless confusion, with girders and pillars lying about just where they had fallen. These charred heaps contained the ashes of hundreds of chairs, the flooring, beams, and framework of the balconies - in a word, the complete interior of the building was one mass of ruin. There was not a vestage of window left in the whole place, and the splintering of the stone work around the windows testified to the terrific heat. The stage end of the theatre is completely destroyed and only the mere skeletons of the front and back walls remain standing. At the north end the substantial brick wall stands intact. Never before has there been seen such a terrible blaze in Bridlington, and perhaps never has the work of destruction been so rapid.
Occupation
At 3 Horsforth Avenue, 4 Bridge Street and with nurseries at Cardigan Road, Bridlington noted in Kelly's Directory of N & E Ridings of Yorkshire, 1913. [Part 1: Localities, Court & Trade Directories].
Occupation
Occupation at James Harold's marriage
Occupation
Transcript of extracts from "I Remember, Reminiscences Of Old Bridlington" By S. Gawthorp:- The New Spa was built in 1896 by Whittaker Bros. of Horsforth......the Spa ..... was then owned by the New Spa and Gardens Company Limited. Up Piercy Lane was Tom Baron's market garden. Tom Baron was the first gardener of the Spa Gardens, which extended much further than they do now, and had little walks and alcoves with seats. On gala nights these used to be hung with candles in little coloured glass pots.
Residence
Address on 1915 Voters List. The list also records that he has a shop at 4 Bridge Street, Bridington.
Occupation
Kelly's Directory 1919
Leisure
Taken in about 1928. Tom Baron is on the right holding the white jug. The two girls on the bench looking towards the camera are Nancy Smith (daughter of Florence Smith nee Baron) and Florence Joyce Baron (known as Betty) illegitimate daughter of Annie Garrett nee Baron. There are probably more of Tom's grandchildren on the bench but we can't see their faces.
Golden Wedding
On 22 October 1934 Thomas and Violetta would have celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary. The photograph would have been taken around that time.
Inscription
Tom annotates these two pages to show that they are leaves from the "old Family Bible".
Occupation
Occupation on 1939 Register
Residence
Address on 1939 Register
Shared note
(Research):Birth Q4 1863 Driffield,9d 249 Death Q1 1940 Buckrose,9d 112 On the birth certificate of Thomas Baron (1863-1940) Anne Baron is recorded as his mother. No father is recorded. However on Thomas's marriage certificate his father is recorded as Tom Baron, a Hotel Keeper.
InscriptionFamily Bible InscriptionFamily Bible Inscription
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Note:
Inside the cover of his family bible Thomas has written: Tom Baron Junr. North Frodingham December 25th 1880 Blessed Lord who has caused all Holy Scriptures to be written for our learning grant that I may in such wise read, mark learn and inwardly digest that by patience and comfort of thy Holy word I may forever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life which thou hast given us through thy dear son Jesus Christ. Tom Baron Junr.
PortraitThomas Baron and Family C1900Thomas Baron and Family C1900
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OccupationNew Spa TheatreNew Spa Theatre
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Note: This Display would have been Tom Baron's work.
PortraitThomas Baron and Family 1905Thomas Baron and Family 1905
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Note: This photo was taken in the New Spa. From bottom left clockwise around Tom and wife Violetta are Annie, Arthur, Edith, James Harold, Florence, Thomas Ernest and Violetta.
Newspaper ReportThe New Spa Fire 1906The New Spa Fire 1906
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Newspaper ReportNew Spa Fire 1906New Spa Fire 1906
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OccupationNew Spa Gardens EntranceNew Spa Gardens Entrance
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OccupationNew Spa EntranceNew Spa Entrance
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PortraitThomas Baron C1920Thomas Baron C1920
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LeisureChildren's PicnicChildren's Picnic
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PortraitThomas and Violetta Baron C1930Thomas and Violetta Baron C1930
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Golden WeddingTom Baron And Violetta c1934Tom Baron And Violetta c1934
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InscriptionFamily BibleFamily Bible
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InscriptionFamily BibleFamily Bible
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PortraitThomas, Florence and Violetta C1936Thomas, Florence and Violetta C1936
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AwardLong Service CertificateLong Service Certificate
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Note: Methodist Church: Sunday School Department Long Service Certificate for 55 years service.
Media objectTom BaronTom Baron
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