Albert Gautier

Albert Charles GAUTIERAge: 84 years19101995

Name
Albert Charles GAUTIER
Given names
Albert Charles
Surname
GAUTIER
Birth 25 December 1910 18 17
Occupation
Shellfish Wholesaler

Occupation
Frozen Food Retailer

Leisure
Albert Gautier and Friend C.1922
1922 (Age 11 years)

Albert Gautier C.1922
Albert Gautier C.1922

Note: Albert rowing in Bridlington Bay with an unknown girl friend.

Leisure
Albert Gautier And Brother Jules C.1923
1923 (Age 12 years)

Albert Gautier And Brother Jules C.1923
Albert Gautier And Brother Jules C.1923

Note: Taken on Bridlington beach. Albert is 2nd left, standing and Jules is next to him seated on the groyne post.

Newspaper Report
Bridlington Free Press
6 October 1923 (Age 12 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in the Bridlington Free Press on 6 October 1923 «b» SWIMMING PROGRESS AT BRIDLINGTON The Annual School Competition«/b» SHIELD WON BY HILDERTHORPE SCHOOL The third annual swimming competitions in connection with the Bridlington Elementary Schools were held at the local Baths on Saturday evening before a large company of interested spectators, amongst whom were the Mayor and Mayoress, Ald.Turner, Mr G G O Sutcliffe, Dr Hutchinson, Mrs Horspool, Mr A E Wilkinson, Mr J Storr, Mr Loader, Mr F Wilkinson, Mr Gosnay and Mr R Newton. All the events were keenly contested, some very fine swimming being witnessed, reflecting great credit on the instructor Mr F G Frankish. The distribution of prizes took place at the Hilderthorpe Schools following the competition. Ald. Turner presided, and swimming in Bridlington today had progressed, but had not attained the position he hoped it would come up to. He felt quite sure that they would have continued success if they crried out the same instructions as previously under the same instructor. If any of the boys fell overboard he felt sure they would know what to do and how to get to shore. Referring to the recent sad bathing fatality at Bridlington, the Chairman said many people who knew how to swim sometimes lost self-confidence. He wanted the boys, if they fell overboard, to say to themselves, " I am going to swim straight to shore." They should get the confidence and swim straight forward, the same as in life. When they had made up their minds as regards a worthy object they should never give up. Alderman Turner spoke of the gratitude of the children to the donors of prizes. Concluding, he said that he had heard that Hilderthorpe boys had once more won the Swimming Shield. (Applause.) He was very pleased they had secured it once more. He hoped and trusted they would endeavour to keep the Shield and felt certain if they followed the instructions given them by Mr Frankish they would never lose it. REPORT BY MR FRANKISH Submitting a short report Mr Frankish stated that ever since the swimming classes had commenced«b» Mr Gautier«/b» had promised to give a watch chain to each boy who could swim a length. This gentleman had not told him yet where he got them from, but his supply seemed to be unlimited. This year he he had the pleasure of giving away fifty-one watch chains. Last year the number presented was 31. Proceeding, Mr Frankish explained that the Education committee also made awards. When a boy was able to swim one length breast stroke and the same back stroke he was given a third class certificate. When he was able to do the same without the use of his hands and turn a somersault from the side of the bath he got a second class certificate. Then for A FIRST CLASS CERTIFICATE he had to do the previous operations, dive five feet, carry a tired swimmer one length and perform a trick. This year they had given 27 third class certificates against 24 last year, 31 second class certificates against 8 and 18 first class certificates against 4. (Applause.) The first four boys to gain first class certificates thought themselves wonderful. There were eighteen wonderful boys this year. (Applause and laughter.) Between 130 and 140 boys had received instruction. A good many could swim across the bath. In continuation, Mr Frankish spoke of the ability to swim as a very valuable acquisition and a great factor in the formation of character. Some boys, he said, clung to the bath side rails in first learning to swim, and would not release their hold without a good deal of persuasion. The fear of the water was a natural one. If, however, they had the necessary grit and determination they learnt to swim. PRESENTATION OF SHIELD The Chairman then introduced Dr Hutchinson, whom, he said, was very found of sport. Dr Hutchinson handed the Challenge Sheild to the Hilderthorpe team, comprising Stanley Martin, Harry Wilkin, «b»Albert «i»(Charles)«/i» Gautier«/b» and Leonard Askham, and mentioned they had just won it by one second. He thought that there was very great credit due to the boys for bringing it back to their school. Mr Frankish announced that the runners up were Oxford Street boys, namely, Weldon, Stacey, Ezard and Whiting, who, through the kindness of Dr Hutchinson were each to be presented with a beautiful knife. Mr J H Amery, headmaster of the Hilderthorpe (Bridlington) School, said he was very pleased that the winning of the Sheild had not been left to the headmaster of his school, for if it had been , he was sure it would not have come there. He was very proud of his four school representatives. They had had the misfortune to lose the services of one of their best swimmers, who had broken a wrist on the football field. Still, after very hard work they had been able to win the Shield, he being sure that one second was a very important one in the history of their school. He had to propose, and with very great pleasure too, a vote of thanks to Dr Hutchinson, the generous donor of their trophy two years ago. The competition had created a great deal of excitement, and rightly so. He had also to propose a vote of thanks to Mr Fred Wilkinson, so well known for his generosity, who had given them four medals to go with the Shield. (Applause.) Seconding the motion, which was cordially carried, Mr J Whiteside, headmaster of the Oxford Street Schools, he and his boys would be very disappointed not to find the Shield in its usual place on Monday. They were glad, however, that Hilderthorpe had not suffered through the loss of their swimmer who broke his wrist. He (Mr Whiteside) felt very sorry for him, that night, He did not know if there was a special prize for him. Continuing, Mr Whiteside expressed his delight at seeing Burlington School in the competition, and said he would not be surprised if this school came along next year and disappointed the other two. Mrs Mainprize distributed the prizes, a special award being given to Leslie Robson the unfortunate Hilderthorpe boy. The Chairman then expressed his thanks to Mrs Mainprize for her services, to Messrs. R Newton and «b»A C Gautier«/b» (the judges), Mr Sigsworth who loaned ladders, the donors of the prizes, and Messrs. Snow and Milner who made certain arrangements in connection with the event. The happy function thenconcluded with a vote of thanks to the Chairman who ably responded. THE WINNERS The following were the winners of the various events:- One Length Breast Stroke - Heat 1; Welburn (Oxford Street), Heat 2; «b»A Gautier«/b» (Hilderthorpe), Heat 3; Herbert Martin (Hilderthorpe), Heat 4; Ben Crawford (Hilderthorpe). Final 1 Crawford; 2 «b»Gautier«/b»; 3 Welburn; 4 Martin. Hutchinson Challenge Sheild. 1 Hilderthorpe School; 2 Oxford Street School; 3 Burlington School. Won by two feet, a yard between 2nd and 3rd. Two Lengths Any Style. Heat 1; 1 Spencer (Burlington), 2 «b»Albert Gautier«/b» (Hilderthorpe), 3 Leonard Askham (Hilderthorpe). Heat 2 Stanley Martin (Hilderthorpe). Final; 1 Martin, 2 «b»Gautier«/b», 3 Askham. One Length Breast Stroke, One Length Back Stroke. Heat 1; C Spencer (Burlington), Heat 2; H Short (Hilderthorpe), Heat 3; W Gee (Hilderthorpe), Heat 4; H Wilkin (Hilderthorpe). Final; 1 Wilkin, 2 Gee, 3 Short, 4 Spencer. Three Lengths Championship. Heat 1; 1 H Ross (Burlington), 2 G Whiting Oxford Street), Heat 2; 1 L Askham, 2 «b»A Gautier«/b», Final 1 Ross, 2 Whiting, 3 Askham, 4 «b»Gautier«/b». Diving. 1 T Welburn (Oxford Street), 2 H Ezard (Oxford Street), 3 J Colley (Oxford Street), 4 G Asquith (Hilderthorpe), 5 Hodgson (Hilderthorpe), 6 H Martin (Hilderthorpe). Two Lengths Fully Dressed. Heat 1 B Crawford (Hilderthorpe), Heat 2 H Wilkin (Hilderthorpe), Heat 3 H Martin (Hilderthorpe). Tired Swimmers Race. Heat 1 W Gee and Ben Crawford (Hilderthorpe), Heat 2 Clifford Spencer and Harry Ross (Burlington), Heat 3 Henry Wilkin and Harry Short (Hilderthorpe). Final 1 Wilkin and Short, 2 Gee and Crawford, 3 Spencer and Ross. Consolation Race One Length. 1 B (Oxford Street), 2 J Tate (Hilderthorpe), 3 J
Occupation
Ship's Cook, Hull Trawlers
1930 (Age 19 years)

Note: Noted in report in Hull Daily Mail 11 May 1991
MarriageMiriam BIRDView this family
16 November 1935 (Age 24 years)
Occupation
Chemical Assistant
16 November 1935 (Age 24 years)

Note: Occupation at marriage to Miriam.
Residence 16 November 1935 (Age 24 years)
Note: Address at marriage to Miriam
Portrait
Albert And Miriam Gautier taken about 1935
1935 (Age 24 years)


Occupation
Fish Merchant
29 September 1939 (Age 28 years)

Note: Occupation noted at 1939 Register.
Residence 29 September 1939 (Age 28 years)
Note: Address noted at 1939 Register.
Residence 5 November 1940 (Age 29 years)
Occupation
Cooked and Bottled Shellfish Wholesaler
1947 (Age 36 years)
MarriageBessie DOWELLView this family
28 May 1969 (Age 58 years)
Residence 28 May 1969 (Age 58 years)
Note: Address at marriage to Bessie.
Occupation
Beef and Dairy Farmer
July 1969 (Age 58 years)
Note: From a piece in the Milk Marketing Board's newsletter The Milk Producer.
Residence 11 May 1991 (Age 80 years)
Note: Address from report in Hull Daily Mail.
Newspaper Report
Hull Daily Mail
11 May 1991 (Age 80 years)

Citation details: Hull Daily Mail 11 May 1991 Fishing Years No. 6
Quality of data: 4
Note:
Transcript from the HULL DAILY MAIL, SATURDAY, MAY 11, 1991 FISHING YEARS No. 6 CLOSE ENCOUNTER WITH SILENT SUB By Mr A C Gautier, 12 Stakesby Vale, Whitby I first went to sea in 1925 a pleasure trip to Iceland in the brand new Lord Deramore. Our only navigation instruments were a compass and a lead line. The skipper probably had a sextant but we never saw the sun or the stars. I well remember the lead line, the water was so deep, no bottom. We hauled it back on board with the winch bollard. After a short stay in Canada I came back to the home country, working big boats or trawlers whenever I could get a job. Some of the trawlers I sailed in included the Myna, Charles Doran and the Commander Evans. I sailed as cook in the Agat, the Kingston Peridot, the Kingston Beryl and others. In 1935 I joined the Kingston Cairngorm. It was with joy and a little sadness that I left a few trips later for a job ashore, knowing that the Kingston Cairngorm's next trip was to the Spit Head Review. Then came the war. I had a year aboard the tug Scotsman, up and down the East Coast. Then a few trips on the A.H.L. boat Irwell. I then signed on the fish carrier Finlande. I well remember the night, whilst in convoy off Whitby, we collided with, and sank, a French boat. Sadly this was with the loss of two of the French crew. She had been sailing alone. I believe we had one fishing trip to Iceland and then back to fish carrying. One trip we landed 996 tons of iced fish, the biggest cargo of fish landed at Hull during the war years. My next ship was the Alonso, 40 years old, bridge aftside, just over 100ft long and total armaments were one rusty Lewis gun. We sailed to Iceland or the Faroes, decks full of coal to the rails. We sailed in all weathers, a loner. One night we found ourselves in the middle of a convoy going in the opposite direction. We steamed within a few yards of a big boat. It brought back memories of the Finlande collision just a few months before. I will never forget one pitch black night off the north of Scotland when outward bound, I was awakened by the engine room telegraph and the engines slowing. I hurried on deck and met a deckie who had just dropped off the bridge he had been sent to waken all hands. "What is it?" I asked. He pointed and whispered, "It's a b- submarine." Sure enough off the port quarter was the conning tower of a submarine. (It seems it had been right alongside of us within hailing distance - by the time I got on deck it had dropped back. "What is it doing?" I whispered. "What does the old man say?" The deckie whispered back, "He's speechless." This episode created a few mysteries of the sea: Was it a friend or foe? How and why did it get so close? Why did it not contact us or sink us? Why oh why, were we whispering? In answer to the last question, some say we did not want to disturb the crew of the submarine. Sadly, shortly after leaving the Alonso, she was reported missing.
Death 12 February 1995 (Age 84 years)
Burial 15 February 1995 (3 days after death)
Unique identifier
A07B1FA4F6F64BF1BC68925A5D4506B16FA2
yes

Last change 3 January 201718:27

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: 14 November 1915Saint Saviours, Islington, London, England
-5 years
himself
7 years
younger brother
4 years
younger brother
22 months
younger sister
6 years
younger brother
Family with Miriam BIRD - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 16 November 1935Brighouse, West Yorkshire, England
5 years
son
Family with Bessie DOWELL - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 28 May 1969The Parish Church, Brighouse, West Yorkshire, England

Newspaper ReportNewspaper Report
Citation details: Hull Daily Mail 11 May 1991 Fishing Years No. 6
Quality of data: 4
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in the Bridlington Free Press on 6 October 1923 «b» SWIMMING PROGRESS AT BRIDLINGTON The Annual School Competition«/b» SHIELD WON BY HILDERTHORPE SCHOOL The third annual swimming competitions in connection with the Bridlington Elementary Schools were held at the local Baths on Saturday evening before a large company of interested spectators, amongst whom were the Mayor and Mayoress, Ald.Turner, Mr G G O Sutcliffe, Dr Hutchinson, Mrs Horspool, Mr A E Wilkinson, Mr J Storr, Mr Loader, Mr F Wilkinson, Mr Gosnay and Mr R Newton. All the events were keenly contested, some very fine swimming being witnessed, reflecting great credit on the instructor Mr F G Frankish. The distribution of prizes took place at the Hilderthorpe Schools following the competition. Ald. Turner presided, and swimming in Bridlington today had progressed, but had not attained the position he hoped it would come up to. He felt quite sure that they would have continued success if they crried out the same instructions as previously under the same instructor. If any of the boys fell overboard he felt sure they would know what to do and how to get to shore. Referring to the recent sad bathing fatality at Bridlington, the Chairman said many people who knew how to swim sometimes lost self-confidence. He wanted the boys, if they fell overboard, to say to themselves, " I am going to swim straight to shore." They should get the confidence and swim straight forward, the same as in life. When they had made up their minds as regards a worthy object they should never give up. Alderman Turner spoke of the gratitude of the children to the donors of prizes. Concluding, he said that he had heard that Hilderthorpe boys had once more won the Swimming Shield. (Applause.) He was very pleased they had secured it once more. He hoped and trusted they would endeavour to keep the Shield and felt certain if they followed the instructions given them by Mr Frankish they would never lose it. REPORT BY MR FRANKISH Submitting a short report Mr Frankish stated that ever since the swimming classes had commenced«b» Mr Gautier«/b» had promised to give a watch chain to each boy who could swim a length. This gentleman had not told him yet where he got them from, but his supply seemed to be unlimited. This year he he had the pleasure of giving away fifty-one watch chains. Last year the number presented was 31. Proceeding, Mr Frankish explained that the Education committee also made awards. When a boy was able to swim one length breast stroke and the same back stroke he was given a third class certificate. When he was able to do the same without the use of his hands and turn a somersault from the side of the bath he got a second class certificate. Then for A FIRST CLASS CERTIFICATE he had to do the previous operations, dive five feet, carry a tired swimmer one length and perform a trick. This year they had given 27 third class certificates against 24 last year, 31 second class certificates against 8 and 18 first class certificates against 4. (Applause.) The first four boys to gain first class certificates thought themselves wonderful. There were eighteen wonderful boys this year. (Applause and laughter.) Between 130 and 140 boys had received instruction. A good many could swim across the bath. In continuation, Mr Frankish spoke of the ability to swim as a very valuable acquisition and a great factor in the formation of character. Some boys, he said, clung to the bath side rails in first learning to swim, and would not release their hold without a good deal of persuasion. The fear of the water was a natural one. If, however, they had the necessary grit and determination they learnt to swim. PRESENTATION OF SHIELD The Chairman then introduced Dr Hutchinson, whom, he said, was very found of sport. Dr Hutchinson handed the Challenge Sheild to the Hilderthorpe team, comprising Stanley Martin, Harry Wilkin, «b»Albert «i»(Charles)«/i» Gautier«/b» and Leonard Askham, and mentioned they had just won it by one second. He thought that there was very great credit due to the boys for bringing it back to their school. Mr Frankish announced that the runners up were Oxford Street boys, namely, Weldon, Stacey, Ezard and Whiting, who, through the kindness of Dr Hutchinson were each to be presented with a beautiful knife. Mr J H Amery, headmaster of the Hilderthorpe (Bridlington) School, said he was very pleased that the winning of the Sheild had not been left to the headmaster of his school, for if it had been , he was sure it would not have come there. He was very proud of his four school representatives. They had had the misfortune to lose the services of one of their best swimmers, who had broken a wrist on the football field. Still, after very hard work they had been able to win the Shield, he being sure that one second was a very important one in the history of their school. He had to propose, and with very great pleasure too, a vote of thanks to Dr Hutchinson, the generous donor of their trophy two years ago. The competition had created a great deal of excitement, and rightly so. He had also to propose a vote of thanks to Mr Fred Wilkinson, so well known for his generosity, who had given them four medals to go with the Shield. (Applause.) Seconding the motion, which was cordially carried, Mr J Whiteside, headmaster of the Oxford Street Schools, he and his boys would be very disappointed not to find the Shield in its usual place on Monday. They were glad, however, that Hilderthorpe had not suffered through the loss of their swimmer who broke his wrist. He (Mr Whiteside) felt very sorry for him, that night, He did not know if there was a special prize for him. Continuing, Mr Whiteside expressed his delight at seeing Burlington School in the competition, and said he would not be surprised if this school came along next year and disappointed the other two. Mrs Mainprize distributed the prizes, a special award being given to Leslie Robson the unfortunate Hilderthorpe boy. The Chairman then expressed his thanks to Mrs Mainprize for her services, to Messrs. R Newton and «b»A C Gautier«/b» (the judges), Mr Sigsworth who loaned ladders, the donors of the prizes, and Messrs. Snow and Milner who made certain arrangements in connection with the event. The happy function thenconcluded with a vote of thanks to the Chairman who ably responded. THE WINNERS The following were the winners of the various events:- One Length Breast Stroke - Heat 1; Welburn (Oxford Street), Heat 2; «b»A Gautier«/b» (Hilderthorpe), Heat 3; Herbert Martin (Hilderthorpe), Heat 4; Ben Crawford (Hilderthorpe). Final 1 Crawford; 2 «b»Gautier«/b»; 3 Welburn; 4 Martin. Hutchinson Challenge Sheild. 1 Hilderthorpe School; 2 Oxford Street School; 3 Burlington School. Won by two feet, a yard between 2nd and 3rd. Two Lengths Any Style. Heat 1; 1 Spencer (Burlington), 2 «b»Albert Gautier«/b» (Hilderthorpe), 3 Leonard Askham (Hilderthorpe). Heat 2 Stanley Martin (Hilderthorpe). Final; 1 Martin, 2 «b»Gautier«/b», 3 Askham. One Length Breast Stroke, One Length Back Stroke. Heat 1; C Spencer (Burlington), Heat 2; H Short (Hilderthorpe), Heat 3; W Gee (Hilderthorpe), Heat 4; H Wilkin (Hilderthorpe). Final; 1 Wilkin, 2 Gee, 3 Short, 4 Spencer. Three Lengths Championship. Heat 1; 1 H Ross (Burlington), 2 G Whiting Oxford Street), Heat 2; 1 L Askham, 2 «b»A Gautier«/b», Final 1 Ross, 2 Whiting, 3 Askham, 4 «b»Gautier«/b». Diving. 1 T Welburn (Oxford Street), 2 H Ezard (Oxford Street), 3 J Colley (Oxford Street), 4 G Asquith (Hilderthorpe), 5 Hodgson (Hilderthorpe), 6 H Martin (Hilderthorpe). Two Lengths Fully Dressed. Heat 1 B Crawford (Hilderthorpe), Heat 2 H Wilkin (Hilderthorpe), Heat 3 H Martin (Hilderthorpe). Tired Swimmers Race. Heat 1 W Gee and Ben Crawford (Hilderthorpe), Heat 2 Clifford Spencer and Harry Ross (Burlington), Heat 3 Henry Wilkin and Harry Short (Hilderthorpe). Final 1 Wilkin and Short, 2 Gee and Crawford, 3 Spencer and Ross. Consolation Race One Length. 1 B (Oxford Street), 2 J Tate (Hilderthorpe), 3 J
Occupation
Noted in report in Hull Daily Mail 11 May 1991
Occupation
Occupation at marriage to Miriam.
Residence
Address at marriage to Miriam
Occupation
Occupation noted at 1939 Register.
Residence
Address noted at 1939 Register.
Residence
Address at marriage to Bessie.
Occupation
From a piece in the Milk Marketing Board's newsletter The Milk Producer.
Residence
Address from report in Hull Daily Mail.
Newspaper Report
Transcript from the HULL DAILY MAIL, SATURDAY, MAY 11, 1991 FISHING YEARS No. 6 CLOSE ENCOUNTER WITH SILENT SUB By Mr A C Gautier, 12 Stakesby Vale, Whitby I first went to sea in 1925 a pleasure trip to Iceland in the brand new Lord Deramore. Our only navigation instruments were a compass and a lead line. The skipper probably had a sextant but we never saw the sun or the stars. I well remember the lead line, the water was so deep, no bottom. We hauled it back on board with the winch bollard. After a short stay in Canada I came back to the home country, working big boats or trawlers whenever I could get a job. Some of the trawlers I sailed in included the Myna, Charles Doran and the Commander Evans. I sailed as cook in the Agat, the Kingston Peridot, the Kingston Beryl and others. In 1935 I joined the Kingston Cairngorm. It was with joy and a little sadness that I left a few trips later for a job ashore, knowing that the Kingston Cairngorm's next trip was to the Spit Head Review. Then came the war. I had a year aboard the tug Scotsman, up and down the East Coast. Then a few trips on the A.H.L. boat Irwell. I then signed on the fish carrier Finlande. I well remember the night, whilst in convoy off Whitby, we collided with, and sank, a French boat. Sadly this was with the loss of two of the French crew. She had been sailing alone. I believe we had one fishing trip to Iceland and then back to fish carrying. One trip we landed 996 tons of iced fish, the biggest cargo of fish landed at Hull during the war years. My next ship was the Alonso, 40 years old, bridge aftside, just over 100ft long and total armaments were one rusty Lewis gun. We sailed to Iceland or the Faroes, decks full of coal to the rails. We sailed in all weathers, a loner. One night we found ourselves in the middle of a convoy going in the opposite direction. We steamed within a few yards of a big boat. It brought back memories of the Finlande collision just a few months before. I will never forget one pitch black night off the north of Scotland when outward bound, I was awakened by the engine room telegraph and the engines slowing. I hurried on deck and met a deckie who had just dropped off the bridge he had been sent to waken all hands. "What is it?" I asked. He pointed and whispered, "It's a b- submarine." Sure enough off the port quarter was the conning tower of a submarine. (It seems it had been right alongside of us within hailing distance - by the time I got on deck it had dropped back. "What is it doing?" I whispered. "What does the old man say?" The deckie whispered back, "He's speechless." This episode created a few mysteries of the sea: Was it a friend or foe? How and why did it get so close? Why did it not contact us or sink us? Why oh why, were we whispering? In answer to the last question, some say we did not want to disturb the crew of the submarine. Sadly, shortly after leaving the Alonso, she was reported missing.
LeisureAlbert Gautier C.1922Albert Gautier C.1922
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 531 × 678 pixels
File size: 229 KB
Highlighted image: no
Note: Albert rowing in Bridlington Bay with an unknown girl friend.
LeisureAlbert Gautier And Brother Jules C.1923Albert Gautier And Brother Jules C.1923
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 675 × 969 pixels
File size: 562 KB
Highlighted image: no
Note: Taken on Bridlington beach. Albert is 2nd left, standing and Jules is next to him seated on the groyne post.
MarriageAlbert And Miriam Gautier Marriage CertificateAlbert And Miriam Gautier Marriage Certificate
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Image dimensions: 1,200 × 397 pixels
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PortraitAlbert And Miriam Gautier 1935Albert And Miriam Gautier 1935
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PortraitAlbert And Miriam Gautier C1935Albert And Miriam Gautier C1935
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ResidenceAlbert Gautier Taken About 1940Albert Gautier Taken About 1940
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OccupationBusiness Card C.1947Business Card C.1947
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OccupationThe Milk ProducerThe Milk Producer
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Newspaper ReportHull Daily Mail 11 May 1991Hull Daily Mail 11 May 1991
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Media objectAlbert GautierAlbert Gautier
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File size: 36 KB
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