Jules Amand Eugene GAUTIERAge: 83 years18301914

Name
Jules Amand Eugene GAUTIER
Given names
Jules Amand Eugene
Surname
GAUTIER
Birth 15 November 1830 35 27

Birth Register Transcript
Birth Register Transcript

Note: French and English

Immigration
to UK
1850 (Age 19 years)

Note: Date as annotated in the registry entry for the French Convalescent Home, Brighton.
MarriageAppoline Euphrasie FAUTRACView this family
1854 (Age 23 years)

Occupation
French Polisher Journeyman
19 December 1854 (Age 24 years)

Citation details: Islington 84
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of first child Jules Paul Victor.
Residence 19 December 1854 (Age 24 years)
Citation details: Islington 84
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of first child Jules Paul Victor
Residence 9 October 1856 (Age 25 years)
Citation details: Islington 156
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of second child Jules Paul Victor.
Occupation
French Polisher
19 October 1856 (Age 25 years)

Citation details: Islington 156
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of second son Jules Paul Victor.
Occupation
Pianoforte Maker Journeyman
30 June 1860 (Age 29 years)

Citation details: St. Pancras 384
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of third child Louis Charle Ernest.
Note: Occupation on Louis' birth certificate
Residence 30 June 1860 (Age 29 years)
Citation details: St Pancras 384
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of third child Louis Charles Ernest.
Note: At Louis' Birth
Occupation
Pianoforte Maker
7 April 1861 (Age 30 years)

Note: Occupation at 1861 Census
Residence 7 April 1861 (Age 30 years)
Note: Address at 1861 Census
Occupation
Cabinet Maker Journeyman
18 May 1862 (Age 31 years)

Citation details: St Pancras 128
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of fourth child Emilie Pauline.
Note: Occupation on Emilie's birth certificate
Residence 18 May 1862 (Age 31 years)
Citation details: St Pancras 128
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of fourth child Emilie Pauline.
Note: At Emilie's birth
Occupation
Pianoforte Manufacturer
1866 (Age 35 years)
Quality of data: 4
Note: Establishment of piano factory from Business Letter Head
Jules Gautier Business Letter Head
Jules Gautier Business Letter Head

Note: In the absence of a family bible this business stationery seems to have been used by someone to record the Gautier genealogy. Subsequent research has proved it to be very accurate.


Upper Holloway 1878
Upper Holloway 1878

Note: The location of Grovedale Road and Duncombe Road are indicated.

Occupation
Pianoforte Maker Master
19 July 1867 (Age 36 years)

Citation details: St Pancras 145
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of fifth child Marie Henriette
Residence 19 July 1867 (Age 36 years)
Citation details: St Pancras 145
Quality of data: 4
Note: Residence at birth of fifth child Marie Henriette.
Occupation
Pianoforte Maker Master
12 August 1869 (Age 38 years)

Citation details: St Pancras 161
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of sixth child Rosa Lizzie.
Gautier Piano Label
Gautier Piano Label

Note: Seems to indicate that he learned his trade working for Collard and Collard.

Residence 12 August 1869 (Age 38 years)
Citation details: St Pancras 161
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of sixth child Rosa Lizzie.
Occupation
Pianoforte Maker
3 April 1871 (Age 40 years)

Citation details: Page 25 Schedule No. 159
Quality of data: 4
Note: Employing two men and one boy
Residence 3 April 1871 (Age 40 years)
Citation details: Page 25 Schedule No. 157
Quality of data: 4
Residence 1871 (Age 40 years)
Note: From 1871 Post Office Directory of London
Occupation
Pianoforte Maker Master
25 July 1872 (Age 41 years)

Citation details: St Pancras 41
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of seventh child Pauline Victoire.
Residence 25 July 1872 (Age 41 years)
Citation details: St Pancras 41
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of seventh child Pauline Victoire
Newspaper Report
Court Appearance
19 November 1872 (Age 42 years)
Note:
Transcript of a report in the Times 19 Nov 1872 Page 9 POLICE Robert Matthews appeared before Mr Mansfield in answer to a summons charging him with neglect to fulfill a contract. Mr W H B Pain, solicitor, conducted the prosecution. Mr C Chew of No 22 Piercefield Street, Kentish Town, pianoforte maker complained that the defendant had undertaken to complete some pianos, but after partly finishing four, he had refused to complete them, and absented himself from work from the 28th of October to the 1st of November and then said he had another place. He had drawn £5 more than was due to him for the work he had done. M. Jules Gautier, another pianoforte maker said the defendant had formerly been in his service, and he had been obliged to summon him. The complainant said he had been obliged to teach another man to finish the work. He had lost £20 by the defendants delinquency. Mr Mansfield ordered the defendant to pay £15 compensation and £1 3s. costs to the complainant, and in default of payment to be imprisoned for three months.
Newspaper Report
The Times 4 Nov 1876 Page 11
4 November 1876 (Age 45 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times Nov 4th 1876 Page 11 POLICE At WORSHIP STREET, MORRIS COHEN, 48, described as a general shipper and leather merchant , living in St Peter's Road, Mile End, was charged with having received a pianoforte which had been obtained by fraud. Mr B J Abbott, solicitor, appeared for the defence. The evidence showed that on Wednesday the 1st inst., a well dressed man entered the shop of Jules Gautier, pianoforte manufacturer, carrying on business in Camden Road, and selected a pianoforte. He stated that the pianoforte was required that evening, and therefore he would send for it himself. Soon afterwards a horse and van arrived and the man in charge handed to Mr Gautier a check for the price of the piano, the check being drawn on the London and County Bank, Lombard Street Branch, and was seen to take the piano to the prisoners house. The check given was afterwards found to be a forgery. The prisoner on being apprehended said it was true this piano had been left at his house, but he did not know who had left it. He also subsequently applied to the police for advice as to what he should do with it and threatened to turn it into the street. Waller, a detective of the K Division, who took the prisoner into custody, said that he had seen the piano in the house and also three other pianos. Mr Abbott said that the piano had been left at the house in the prisoner's absence, by whom he could only guess, and he was willing to give the police any information. The other pianos mentioned had been purchased by the prisoner in the ordinary course of business, and his checks in payment for them woul be produced. Mr Bushby remanded the prisoner and on the application of Mr Abbott allowed bail - the prisoner himself in £2000 and two sureties of £1000 each. The prisoner in default was locked up.
Newspaper Report
The Times 27 Nov 1876
27 November 1876 (Age 46 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times 27 Nov 1876 Page 11 POLICE MORRIS COHEN, 48, shipper and leather merchant ,of St. Peter's-road, Mile End, was charged on remand with receiving, with guilty knowledge, five pianos which had been obtained by false pretences and by means of forged checks. Mr Wontner prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury; Mr Besley and Mr B. J. Abbott defended. Mr Wontner, it may be remembered, stated that the prisoner was a receiver of goods obtained by an organised gang of persons known as the "Long Firm." The prisoner was originally brought before the Court on a charge of receiving a piano which had been obtained by a man representing himself as "Harris and Co.," from Mr Gautier, manufacturer, of Camden-road. "Harris and Co." gave a check for £25 in payment, and the check when presented at the London and County Bank, Lombard Street, was pronounced a forgery of the bank form. The prisoner was subsequently charged with having obtained by similar means a piano from a Mrs Hardy living in Meyrick-square, and with having obtained three pianos by means of a check for £82 odd from the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company, these pianos being also found at the prisoner's house. In the latter case the pianofortes were delivered by the company at a shop in Windmill-street, Finsbury, which it appeared had been taken for the day only, and which after the check was discovered to be a forgery was found shut up. The prisoner carried on business in the Minories, and there, as well as at his house in St Peter's-road, a large quantity of property was found, comprising steam gauges, bicycles, sewing-machines, frying pans, &c, and much of this property formed the subject of charges now under investigation at the Mansion-house, and concerning which three persons are in custody. Mr Wontner said the prisoner would be included in the indictment with the others. The prisoner's own books showed that he had been dealing for years with known swindlers. The prisoner was fully committed for trial at the Central Criminal Court, an application by Mr Besley for bail being referred to a Judge at Chambers.
Court
He gave evidence against one Morris Cohen
13 March 1877 (Age 46 years)
Newspaper Report
The Times 14 Mar 1877 Page 11
13 March 1877 (Age 46 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times 14 Mar 1877 Page 11 «b»CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT, March 13 «/b» THIRD COURT («i»Before Sir«/i» THOMAS CHAMBERS,«i» the Common Serjeant«/i».) Morris Cohen, one of "the Long Firm" so called, was indicted for a conspiracy to defraud. Mr Bulwer Q.C., with whom were Mr Dicey and Mr Mr Cowie, conducted the case for the prosecution; Mr Grain and Mr Tickell the defence. Pauline Gotier (sic), having been called as a witness, said, - I am the wife of Mr Gotier (sic), a pianoforte-maker. In November last I advertised a piano for sale in the «i»Daily Telegraph«/i», and I remember a person calling about the piano and asking to see it. My husband was going out at the time. I showed him the piano, whcih he did not like, and he chose one from the stock, the price of which was 26 guineas. He offered £25 cash for it, which I accepted. He said he would send for it, and that he was in the provision line in London-wall. He declined to leave a deposit, saying he would call and pay for it. He left, and shortly before 4 o'clock a van was drawn up to the door by two men. I opened an envelope which had been handed to me, and found a check in it. The piano was put into the van , which was in charge of two men, and they went away. I asked my son to follow the van. Louis Gotier (sic), a lad of 17, son of the previous witness, said he remembered the man Hart coming to their place of business and talking to his mother about the piano. Witness saw the piano taken away, having previously helped to put it in the van. Two men came for it, and there was a third near the house, whose manner aroused their suspicions. The van went as far as the College Arms, where it stopped; the two men went inside and four others came out, some of whom witness had seen on the bridge. On leaving the house all four got into the van and went a long circuitous route in the direction of the Hackney-road, where they entered the Devonshire Arms, and then went on, stopping at a place in the Minories, near Cohen's premises. Harris, who was with them, got down from the van and spoke to a man at a gateway. He got into the van again and drove down Whitechapel-road at a trot to St. Peter's-street, where Cohen lived. Witness stood at the opposite side of the street. One of the men got off the van and came and looked at witness very hard. The piano was taken through a gateway into a stable by three of the men who had got down from the van for that purpose. They first went to the house door, which was opened by some one from the inside. After the piano had been delivered the van went away, and witness followed. Two young women received the piano. Harris had joined the two men. Witness in the result went home and told his father what had become of the piano, upon which he and his father went to the place in London-wall, and found there was no one named Harris residing there. Witness's father brought a sergeant of police, on which the door was opened by a young man, to whom his father spoke; but the door was fastened by a chain from inside when shut. A man had previously come out and looked at witness with the sergeant, and had then gone in, shutting the door after him. They remained watching until 12 o'clock. Next morning, about 6 o'clock, witness went to the house and his father left. He and his father had been away a short time before 12 o'clock. Next morning he man who opened the door spoke to witness's father; at 7 his father relieved witness, who then went away. When Cohen came out he spoke to witness's father about having been watching all night. Witness remained there the whole day. Cohen came two or three times to witness, and, saying he looked cold, asked hime to heve a cup of coffe, which he declined. He then said to witness,"Come in and look at the piano and see if it yours." Witness went in and saw it in a bedroom on the ground floor. A man was sleeping in the room. Witness was told to take the piano away, the reason assigned being that it was no use his trying to catch men who were outof London by that time. About ten minutes afterwards the man returned with Harris and came to the street door. On seeing the witness they went in another direction, and witness followed them. He asked Harris if he was the man who bought a piano in Camden-road. He said he was not, and witness was mistaken. Witness replied that he was not, upon which he went away. At that time witness knew nothing about a check. Witness returned and remained until the evening, when the police came and took the piano away. Cross-examined by Mr Grain, witness said he recognized Harris at once. Being asked why he did not call a constable, he said he preferred to go himself for one. Before the men went to Aldgate they had gone to a place a few minutes' walk away from Cohen's private house, where all of them got into the van, which was then driven away. By Mr BULWER. - Witness at that time did not know whether the check was a good one or not. Mr Jules Gotier (sic), father of the previous witness, gave evidence for the prosecution, corroborating that of his son, adding that the prisoner denied all knowledge of a piano being brought there at all, upon which the door was shut in the face of witness, who heard it locked inside. Witness remained outside all night watching the place, his son rejoining him in the morning and remaining with him until about 8 o'clock. After that witness presented the check at the bank, where it was dishonoured, upon which he gave the prisoner into custody. He was afterwards told that if he did not take his piano away it would be turned out into the street. He replied that he was not there to watch the house but to look after his piano. The prisoner assured him that he was not a man to lend himself to anything of the kind, adding that his wife had foolishly taken in a piano for the evening on an assurance being given her that a warehouse were it was about to be placed had been closed for the night. The prisoner added that it was a "plant" on him by some wicked men to ruin him and that if he did not take his piano away he would turn it out into the street. Witness eventually said if the check turned out to be a bad one he should give him charge of the police. Upon that he called God to witness that he was innnocent, and that drink was ruining him. Witness, on going to the bank, found the check to be a bad one, and he gave the prisoner into custody. Police Inspector O'Callaghan was recalled, and said that on seeing the prisoner at the police station, and while the charge was being made, he declared he was innocent; that he knew nothing of the matter, adding that the piano was taken in by his daughter during his absence; That she was there and would tell them all about it. She then said two men brought the piano to their house in a van; that her father was then from home, and , ahving no instructions from him, she declined to receive it, not knowing what to do with it. The prisoner afterwards said to witness,"Mind, I don't know Harris and Co.; say I don't know them; at least I don't know them as Harris and Co." The prisoner afterwards lifted up his hands and called upon God to witness that he was innocent. Mrs Ann Hardy, a widow, residing in Merrick-square, spoke to a man calling on her, saying he understood she had apiano for sale, asking how much she wanted for it. She said eight guineas and he agreed to give it. Being asked how he was going to pay, he said,"Not by instalments;" he could pay 80 guineas if necessary, adding that he would send a man for it. He gave her his address A van or cart came in the afternoon with two men, and the prisoner, who was with them, gave her the check produced, upon which the piano was taken away. Next morning, on the check being taken to the bank it was dishonoured. She gave information to the police but heard nothing about her piano until she read a police report in the newspapers. Witness's daughter corrborated the evidence of her mother, adding that she asked the prisoner how he was going to pay the money. Evading the question, he said to her,"Do you think I want six months credit?" John Embly, a carman, spoke to a man having engaged him on the 31st of October, with his van, to remove a piano from Trinity-square, Southwark, to a house with the name "Cohen" on the door, and to two women there having taken it in. Mr William Barrett, connected with the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company, said he remembered on the 18th of September one Harris calling himself a general dealer, buying three pianos, which he said were for shipment, for which cash was to be paid. He selected three, and they were delivered in a van, one of the men present giving a check on the London and County Bank for £82 9s 9d It was taken to their banker's where it was dishonoured. Witness with a police inspector went to Cohen's premises in the Minories, where he saw his three pianos. He had never received anything in respect of them. The company took off 30 per cent. The price of each piano would have been £45. The cost to the trade was about £23 10s, but these were French pianos, with which the witness was not so familiar. Charles Hunt, a clerk at the London and County Bank, Lombard-street, said they had no account with Harris and Co., and the checks in question were not written on their form at all. He certainly considered those in question forgeries. They were all numbered alike - not consecutively. Thomas Channing, living at 5, Wentworth-road, Mile-end, said he had resided there six years and had not known any person named Harris or Hart living there, and no person could have used those premises for business purposes without his knowledge. Mr Washington Yarroo (sic - actually Yurrow), who had resided in London-wall for 21 years, deposed that he never knew anyone named Harris or Hart living there. If he had lived there he must have been his tenants, he being the landlord. Police-detective Waller siad he took Cohen into custody on the 2nd of November, and verified a statement he made when so arrested. This was the case for the prosecution, and Mr GRAIN addressed the jury for the defence, complaining at the outset that an article had appeared in the «i»Daily Telegraph«/i» of that morning on the subject-matter of the trial, contrary to all custom, he submitted, while the matter was «i»sub judice«/i». Mr Grain then addressed himself to the circumstances as they were elicited in evidence, which he reviewed in some detail, dwelling especially on the fact of the piano in question having been taken into the house by the prisoner's daughter, and upon his saying, when the circumstances came to his knowledge, that he knew nothing about the piano, and that it was a "plant" upon him.He referred to a number of checks he produced in court, and which had been given in payment of pianos. He asked the jury, in conclusion, to rise superior to prejudice on the occasion, and to acquit the prisoner. Miss Jane Cohen, a daughter of the accused, was called and proved that on the 1st of November a man came to their house who she did not know and said he had brought a piano for Mr Cohen to look at, and asked if she would take it in. Witness said she had no instructions to take it in, and she asked why he did not take it to the warehouse. He went away and returned in the evening, when witness was then in the house alone, and he told her he found the warehouse closed, that she had better take the piano in, and that he had had great trouble with it. Upon that two or three men and her servant carried it into the house, the men saying they would call in the morning about it. Her father came home towards 3 o'clock, and she told him what had happened as to the piano, upon which he was very much annoyed. He had previously cautioned her about taking in goods. Another daughter of Mr Cohen spoke to her father being very short sighted, and to her having to keep his books as a consequence. Mr Phillips and Mr Israel, both members of the Common Council, were called as witnesses to character, Mr Phillips stating that he had known the defendant ten years at least, and had always regarded him as a highly respectable gentleman, adding that he was so regarded also in the Ward which he , Mr Phillips, had the honour to represent in the Common Council. Mr Magnus and Mr Sapter corroborated the previous witnesses in that respect. Mr GRAIN, the prisoner's council, urged the jury to give him the benefit of any doubt they might have on the subject. Mr BULWER, for the prosecution, dwelt in very strong terms on the prisoners conduct in the transactions in question, which he recounted in some detail, observing in conclusion, that in cases of that kind, if the jury had any doubt on the subject, they ought to give the prisoner the benefit of it. The COMMON-SERJEANT then summed up the case to the jury, reminding them that it was one of receiving three pianos from the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company. He read the evidence in detail, leaving the jury eventually to say whether they were satisfied with the transaction as it came out in eveidence. It was, he said, beyond all controversy that the prisoner received the goods; but the question was, what did he know of the men? In a case like that under consideration, the offence was not in the actual receiving of the goods, but in the state of mind of the person when he did receive them. The jury then retired, and, after being absent about a quarter of an hour, returned into Court with a verdict of «i»Guilty«/i» on all the counts in the indictment. It was then stated by the prisoner's council that there was nothing else against him, and he dwelt on the bad state of health to which he was now reduced, consequent on his having been so long in prison. The COMMON-SERJEANT, addressing the prisoner, said he had very properly been convicted, though only on the counts for receiving, and he need not tell him that the prisoner was the worst of all the "Long Firm" gang, so called, the receiver being worse than the thief. As to the state of the prisoners health, that, of course, would attended to while he remained in prison. He was sorry to see a man commanding the confidence and respect of his friends, as he had done for some time, in state in which he now was. He sentenced him to five years penal servitude on the first indictment, and five years on the second.
Newspaper Report
The Times 19 May 1877 Page 13
19 May 1877 (Age 46 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times 19 May 1877 Page 13 POLICE At WORSHIP-STREET, ALFRED GLIDDON, stated to be the manager of the City Bank, Edgeware-road Branch; LEWIS LAZARUS of St. Peter's-street, Mile-end; and DAVID DANZIGER, of Tavistock-crescent, Kensal-town, appeared before Mr Bushby in obedience to summonses charging them with having conspired with other persons by unlawful and corrupt means to obstruct the due course of law and justice with intent to procure the withdrawal of certain charges of misdemeanour against Morris Cohen. Mr St. John Wontner prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury; Mr Poland and Mr Besley were for Gliddon, Mr Grain and Mr B J Abbott for Lazarus, and Mr Chapman, solicitor, for Danziger. Mr Wontner said that the man Cohen, who outwardly appeared to be carrying on the business of an exporter in Houndsditch, was in Novenber last indicted on more than one count at the Central Criminal Court for receiving a number of articles, all of great value, which had been obtained by a man named Francis, a ticket-of -leave man whose licence at that time was unexpired. The books of the defendant Cohen showed that the goods in question were obtained by Francis, and the police had taken possesssion of the books; the daughter of the prisoner Cohen must have known perfectly well that Francis would have to appear in the case. Francis, against whom a warrant was obtained, had, however, disappeared, and from the facts of the case against the present defendants, it was not unfair to suppose that Gliddon might be credited with having caused the disappearance of Francis. Cohen was originally brought before this Court on a charge of receiving a piano obtained from a Mr Gautier, by means of a fictitious check. The enquiries of the police in the matter led to discovery of the fact that Cohen had an account at the City Bank, Aldgate Branch, of whcih Gliddon was at that time the manager. Cohen was released on bail when his case first came before the Court, and while the police were making enquiries about the matter, and every day discovering that there were other cases against Cohen, the dfendants Gliddon and Lazarus were found visiting Mr Gautier's shop and offering, if he would withdraw from the charge, to pay him the price of the piano and all expenses to which he had been put. This, Mr Wontner in some detail said, had been done on several occasions, Mr Gliddon going to visit Mr Gautier in the intervals of remands in the face of the facts. By the publicity given and from his being present in court he must have known that the solicitor to the Treasury had been instructed to take up the prosecution, that on each remand fresh charges were being brought against the man Cohen, and that he was stated to be about to be indicted with persons who had been apprehended on warrants and against whom numerous charges of obtaining goods had been preferred. Mr Wontner did not wish to say anything against persons whose position, like that of Mr Gliddon or Mr Lazarus, was so respectable; but whatever their motives, whether they were actuated by more than friendship for the man Cohen or from interest, it was certain that they did commit themselves to an illegal agreement and combine in point of law, and as such had beeen guilty not only of an attempt to compromise a misdemeanour , but of a conspiracy in the terms set out in the charge. John O'Callaghan, Inspector K Division, said that while Cohen was under remand he saw Gliddon, who asked what witness thought of the case against Cohen. Witness, knowing of the other cases against Cohen, expressed the opinion that he would be convicted. Gliddon said,"You ought to think of his poor daughters and not press him so hard." Gliddon added that there were many others who had been doing what Cohen had done - buying of persons who had anything to sell without asking questions or making proper enquiry. It was, he said, a common thing in London. Witness told Gliddon that he had not come about Cohen but about Francis and asked for information. Gliddon said that Francis had been introduced to the bank by a customer, and they had made inquiries. He declined to let witness see those inquiries, remarking that it was not usual. Witness also inquired respecting a person named Kneiler, whose name appeared in Cohen's books. Mr Poland, on behalf of Gliddon, and Mr Grain on behalf of Lazarus, aplied for permission to reserve their cross-examination for the present. Mr Chapman had no questions to ask. Mrs Gautier, wife of Jules Gautier, pianoforte-maker, of 62, Camden-road, deposed to two men having on the 1st of November purchased at her shop a piano for £25, and they gave a check for the amount. The check was drawn in the name of Harris. The men removed the piano in a cart they brought, but witness, not feeling satisfied, sent her son to watch it to its destination. The check having been preented next day was returned, and her husband gave the man Cohen into custody. On the 9th, the day before the remand, in the evening, The defendants Gliddon and Lazarus presented themselves at the shop, 62, Camden-road. Gliddon told her he knew Cohen, and his family were all respectable, and that he had come to ask her husband not to prosecute. He asked if her husband had a solicitor. She said she thought so, but could not tell where they could find him. Gliddon had given her his card and said he was manager of the City Bank. He would prefer to see the solicitor as he could arrange it with him, and her husband need not attend the court. He asked her the price of the piano which had been taken, and when she told him he said, "Well we will buy it of him, and as your husband has been put to trouble during the week we will pay what expenses you have been put to." Gliddon went on to suggest that that if her hsuband was willing to arrange the matter it would be nothing out of his pocket. He, Cohen, had four daughters who were in great distress, and he asked her if she , as the mother of a family would not pity them. Gliddon added that he was certain Cohen was innocent, and had been the dupe of Harris, or words to that effect. Lazarus was in the room all the time. Gliddon said Harris was the one who should be punished. Witness said that she had heard that there were three other pianos belonging to the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company found in Cohen's place, and asked if her husband did not go to court, what about the other pianos? Gliddon replied that they would hear no more about them. They had settled four cases, and it would be all right. A day or two afterwards Gliddon called again and asked to see her husband, and said he wanted to arrangewith him not to attend the court, as he was certain that Cohen was perfectly innocent. She mentioned the name of Mrs Hardy, whom she had heard give evidence in the court the day before. Gliddon said they had had an interview with Mrs Hardy and she did not want to go on. In the evening they came again and saw her husband. On the 17th she found that the Treasury had taken up the prosecution. On the 23rd, while Cohen was still under remand, Gliddon, a Miss Cohen and the defendant Danziger came to her shop. Gliddon asked if they had received any subpoenas for next day, and when she said she did not know, he said that if they had not there was no necessity for their attending the court. They also said that if her husband would arrange the matter it would be a good thing for him, as Cohen was a large shipper of pianos, and he would deal with her husband. He added that he was ready to pay the £25 for the piano and the expenses of the solicitor, so it would be nothing out of her husband's pocket. Gliddon left and Danziger and Miss Cohen remained and saw her husband. The witness was not cross-examined, an adjournment being taken at the close of her examination in chief. Mr Wontner said he did not oppose bail. Mr Bushby, after some conversation upon the matter, fixed the bail for Mr Gliddon at two sureties in £1000 each and himself double that amount. Lazarus was ordered to find two bail in £250 each, and enter into his own recognizances in £500, and Danziger was ordered to give two sureties in £100 each and himself in £200. Bail having been given the defendants were liberated.
Newspaper Report
The Times 25 May 1877 Page 11
25 May 1877 (Age 46 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times 25 May 1877 Page 11 POLICE At WORSHIP-STREET, ALFRED GLIDDON, manager of the City Bank, Edgeware-road Branch; LEWIS LAZARUS, traveller, and DAVID ZANZIGER(sic), traveller, appeared to adjourned summonses charging them with having in November last consoired to defeat by corrupt means the due course of law and justice and to procure the withdrawal of certain charges of misdemeanour against one Morris Cohen, a prisoner then under trial, and to procure his discharge from custody. Mr St. John Wontner appeared for the prosecution on behalf of the Government; Mr Poland and Mr Besley defended Gliddon; Mr Grain and Mr B J Abbott defended Lazarus; and Mr Lee, solicitor, defended Zanziger(sic). Jules Gautier, pianoforte -maker, 62, Camden-road, said that on 1st of November, while he was away from home, a person who called himself Harris called there. There was then a piano in the shop. On his return the piano was gone, and a check signed "Harris and Co.," the address given being London-wall, was handed to him by his wife. Witness found also that his son was out watching the parties in possession of the piano, and he himself watched a house in St. Peter's-street, Mile-end, and saw a man whom he afterwards knew as Cohen. Later, on the 2nd, witness having presented the check, which was dishonoured, gave Cohen into custody for receiving the piano. He was charged before this Court on the following day and remanded until the 10th. On the night of the 9th witness heard from his wife that some persons had been there to see him. On entering the warehouse he saw the defendant Lazarus, who said,"Mr Gautier, I am come here on behalf of Mr Cohen, who is a friend of mine. I am sorry he has got into this trouble, and I can assure you he is a very honest and upright man." and witness replied,"You may say what you like about his honesty, but if my son had not followed the van I should have lost my piano." Witness told him that he was satisfied that both Lazarus and the friend who had come with him had only come for the direct purpose of compounding a felony. Lazarus refused to give him his name and address. The next morning, while witness was waiting in the neighbourhood of this court for the case of Cohen to be called on, the defendant Gliddon accosted him, and said that he wished to speak to him on behalf of Cohen. Witness asked Gliddon if he had called at his house the day before, and on his replying that he had, witness referred him to his solicitor, who was standing by. Gliddon then began to tell the solicitor that Cohen was a highly respectable man, that there were a number of City merchants ready to testify to his character, and that another charge made by the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company had been withdrawn in consequence. Witness's solicitor asked Gliddon what they wished done, and he replied,"Let him keep away. Do not let him appear at all." Witness's solicitor declined to advise that. Glidden said they would get Cohen remanded from week to week and then, as witness was left alone his case would fall to the ground. Witness's solicitor said they could make an application to allow the charge to be withdrawn. Gliddon said that would do. He did not want to do anything irregular. Then he walked away. In court witness heard an application made on behalf of Cohen to allow the case to be withdrawn, it being stated that the prosecutor desired it. That was not true. The police preferred another charge, and eventually the magistrate refused to allow the charge to be withdrawn. On the following Thursday the defendant Gliddon, with a Miss Cohen came to witness, the object of their visit being to get witness to go to Judges' Chambers and consent to Cohen being let out on bail. William Cook, housekeeper at 18, John-steet, Minories, deposed that some offices in that building were occupied by persons passing as Francis and Co. They left on the 9th of November suddenly and without notice. He had never heard of them since. Witness knew that large quantities of goods were frequently transferred form Francis's place to Cohen's warehouse in the Minories. Mr Wontner here remarked that the object of this evidence, for what it was worth, was to show that when the police had been to Gliddons bank on the 8th to make inquiries as to Francis and Co, who had been found dealing with Cohen, Francis and Co. with all their companions disappeared. Mr Bushby asked what inference he wished drawn fom the connexion of dates. Mr Wontner said that Gliddon connived at the escape of Francis and Co. The witness Cook added that Francis and Co. had, prior to the 9th, attended daily at their offices. Goods came daily and were removed, and goods came after Francis disappeared. Mrs Hardy, a widow, living in Meyrick-square, Southwark, deposed to a piano being obtained from her by Harris and Co., who gave her a check on the London and County Bank, Lombard-street. The check was subsequently found to be a forgery. The piano was found at Cohen's place, and she appeared against him. The defendants Gliddon and Zanziger(sic) called upon her and asked her to withdraw from the case, telling her she would not be the loser. The case was further adjourned for a fortnight, the defendants being liberated on the same bail as before.
Court
He Gave Evidence Against Gliddon, Lazarus And Danziger
29 June 1877 (Age 46 years)
Note: He gave evidence against Alfred Gliddon, Louis Lazarus and David Danziger who were charged with attempting to pervert the course of justice in the trial of Morris Cohen.
Trial Of Gliddon, Lazarus And Danziger
Trial Of Gliddon, Lazarus And Danziger

Note: The account of the proceedings starts at the bottom of the first page

Newspaper Report
The Times 17 Nov 1877 Page 5
17 November 1877 (Age 47 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times 17 Nov 1877 Page 5 RELEASE OF A PRISONER Mr Alfred Gliddon, late manager of the Aldgate Branch of the City Bank, has been released from prison by order of the Home Secretary. On the 29th of June Mr Gliddon was tried at the Central Criminal Court, with Lewis Lazarus and David Danziger, on the charge of endeavouring to induce a person named Gautier to withdraw from the prosecution of a man named Cohen, connected with the "Long Firm," and since sentenced to ten years' penal servitude. Gliddon was committed for six months and Lazarus and Danziger for four months each. The inhabitants of West Drayton, were Mr Gliddon is minister of the Baptist chapel, joined in a memorial for the remission of the sentence, and on his arrival at the railway station he was met by members of his congregation and heartily cheered. During his imprisonment he was treated as a first-class misdemeanant.
Residence 14 June 1878 (Age 47 years)
Note: Address at death of wife.
Newspaper Report
London Gazette
16 November 1878 (Age 48 years)

Note:
Transcript of an entry in the London Gazette dated 22 November 1878 on Page 193 The Bankruptcy Act, 1869. In the London Bankruptcy Court, In the Matter of Proceedings for Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by Jules Gautier, of No. 62, Camden-road, Camden Town, in the county of Middlesex, Pianoforte Manufacturer. Notice is hereby given, that a First General Meeting of the creditors of the above-named person has been summoned to be held at the offices of Mr W P Moore, No. 26, Bedford-row, in the county of Middlesex, on the second day of December, 1878, at two o'clock in the afternoon precisely. Dated this 16th day of November, 1878. W M PLAYTERS MOORE, Solicitor for the said Debtor.
Occupation
Pianoforte Maker
14 June 1880 (Age 49 years)

Citation details: St Pancras 98
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at marriage of daughter Emelie Pauline to John Humphrey Wallis
Residence 14 June 1880 (Age 49 years)
Citation details: St Pancras 98
Quality of data: primary evidence
Note: Address at marriage of daughter Emelie Pauline to John Humphrey Wallis.
Patent
Application For Letters Patent 3600
4 September 1880 (Age 49 years)

Note: Gautier, Jules (trading as Jules Gautier & Co), pianoforte manufacturer, of 172, Euston-road, London, for "Improvements in pianofortes." - Dated September 4th, 1880. 3600
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 October 1880 (Age 49 years)

Note:
Transcript of an entry in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review dated 1 Oct 1880 Page 27: Musical Inventions Patented England Application for Letters Patent Gautier, Jules (trading as Jules Gautier & Co), pianoforte manufacturer, of 172, Euston-road, London, for "Improvements in pianofortes." - Dated September 4th, 1880. 3600
Newspaper Report
Birmingham Daily Post
4 March 1881 (Age 50 years)

Note:
Transcript of an entry in the Birmingham Daily Post dated 4 Mar 1881: NEW PATENTS (Contributed by Mr George Shaw) The following patents, amongst others, were sealed during the week ended March 3, 1881:- Jules Gautier, London, improvements in pianofortes. Dated September 4th, 1880
Occupation
Pianoforte Maker
4 April 1881 (Age 50 years)

Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 108
Quality of data: 4
Residence 4 April 1881 (Age 50 years)
Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 105
Quality of data: 4
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 August 1881 (Age 50 years)

Note:
Transcript of three entries in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review dated 1Aug 1881:- Page 418 The Equistrung Vertical Iron Frame To the Editor: Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review SIR,--In the issue of «i»Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review«/i» for June appeared a paragraph to the effect that "Mr James Kew, music smith, of Camden Town, had just patented one or two improvements in the construction of vertical iron fame pianofortes, whereby the necessity of having breaks in the spacing of the springs is avoided." The following particulars in reference to the matter may be of interest to your readers, and may obviate very considerable misunderstanding. On enquiry at the patent office it will be found that Mr James Kew's so-called invention is dated November 15th, 1880, and had received provisional protection only, as he (Mr Kew) failed to give notice to proceed with his application; and letters patent have never been granted to him. My attention was drawn to this by my clients, Messrs. Jules Gautier & Co., of 172, Euston Road, who are the solemakers of the "equistrung vertical iron frame pianoforte" invented by Mr Jules Gautier, for which letters patent were granted, dated so far back as September 4th, 1880 (prior to the date of Mr Kew's application), in proof of which I enclose to you the official blue book of Mr Jules Gautier's specification. Trusting to your well known sense of fair play for the insertion of this letter, I am, Sir, yours obediently, WALTER A. BARLOW Agent for Messrs. Jules Gautier & Co. 6, St Paul's Churchyard, EC, July 13th, 1881 Page 419 New Patents and Inventions IMPROVEMENTS IN PIANOFORTES [JULES GAUTIER] This invention relates to certain improvements in or applicable to the manufacture of iron frame pianos, which improvements, in combination with old parts, constitutes a new or improved instrument; which, whilst giving a higher quality of tone and greater resisting power and strength to the construction of the piano, also considerably reduces the cost of production. The invention consists, first, in the construction in the iron frame for vertical pianofortes whereby the usual scale of keys and hammer-rail can be used , and obviating the "break" or "breaks" in the keys and the hammer rail which has hitherto been found necessary in all vertical pianos manufactured with the iron frame. This iron frame is constructed as follows:-The said iron frame is a casting, the pattern for which is made of an irregular plate with portions cut away for lightening the frame, and said plate acts as web for supporting the strengthening bars. The end of the frame at the "bass" end is strengthened by a bar of no special form, but convenient.The next intermediate bar is special, in so far as that the the length thereof upwards is reduced and run off to a feather, so that the head of such bar shall not interfere with the "action" or the wires, so avoiding the break as otherwise necessitated; and to compenstae for the reduced strength and length of the bar, a feather piece or projection is provided on the back of the plate of the frame at the back of the aforsaid bar. The next intermediate bar, as it is towards the treble end of the frame at the point of the greatest amount of strain of the wires, must be of great resisting power, but yet it must be narrowso as not to interfere with the wires, and therefore it is that I make it very deep or of considerable projection, and such projection in such position that it will come between the hammer and lever rails of the action, thereby avoiding the second "break". Strengthening feathers are also placed at the back of the plate and of the said bar. At the extreme feather end of the frame I carry up the end supporting bar to about the level of the top row of wrest pins, and also carry up the plate to about the same height, so that I can bolt the frame by this extra portion of the plate to the wrest plank and end support of the back, and this piece also acts as an abutment for the end of the down pressure bar at the bass end of the iron bridge, and just below the same a small portion of the frame is cut away - that is, a recess is made, into which the end of the wooden bass bridge is received and rests. As the wires have to be carried in a slightly oblique direction to pass the bars of the frame at that point, and the plank scale must nevertheless be so divided as to allow room for the wrest pins and tuning hammer, the down pressure bar is made with registered grooves, pins, or holes at the back thereof, so as to register and regulate the direction of every non-covered string of the pianoforte upon the smooth iron bridge of the frame, thereby obviating the irregularities caused by any irregular plank scale, a defect which is apparent in almost every iron frame piano; but this registering down pressure bar is generally applicable for keeping these wires of a pianofore in register; and it will be seen that the wires will from this construction be regularly in register without "breaks" and any ordinary action will be able to be used, thus saving the costs and imperfections of specially made actions. In making up the piano with this iron frame, the wires have to pass close to the bars of the frame, and thus the lower bridge pins which regulate the side "draught of the wires, have to come very close to the ends of the "belly-bridges", where there is consequently but little wood left in which said pins can hold; I therefore use what I call twin or triplet pins, these pins being made with a connecting head, the two or three pins thereof are driven into the bridge and support each other against the "side draught" of the strings; the importance thereof will be recognised by every practical man. Further, by this construction of the iron frame, the "back" of the piano can be made without intermediate bracings, thereby enabling the acoustician to do what may be desired with or manipulate as he pleases the sound board either for alterations for modifying the tone, or for addition of other instruments, in combination with the piano, which opens a large field for improvements, inasmuch as that thereby the same sound board is rendered accessible in every one of its parts. In doing away with the bracings, the "pillar bolts" cannot find bearing therein, therefore i Make provision for this by carrying bracing bolts through the framing with flat shanks, which are bolted over or under the intermediate rail of the key bottom, and through the iron plate, against which they are screwed up by means of the front and back nuts thereon, which nuts grip the iron frame through which the bolts are passed, one nut being on the front and the other on the back of the said frame. The end of the shanks of the said bolts are turned up, and take up position in a morticein the front rail of framing, so bracing the piano, and any provision for strength can be provided in the key bottom framing. The construction of the "back" of the piano consists of a beam which will be recessed into and be supported by two end supports and bottom bar, upon which said beam and supports the wrest plank is glued, as also is the back piece; and to further secure the beam to the supports, dowels are driven in from the sides through the supports and into bearing beam, thus providing a back of great strength. In this construction of piano, the usual methods of applying the "celeste" or mute pedal are not practicable, therefore I place and fix the celeste movement to the action frame by means of an upright central slide, whcih supports the celeste rail; the slide has therein slotted holes and screws are provided, one on the hammer rail and another on the lever rail, which screw passes through said slots, and so the celeste is readily applied and removed, and an elastic cord spring is employed to bring the celeste down when acted upon by the pedal; the ends of the celeste rail work in recesses in standards of the action. The pedal movement is in this case effected by an upright rod from the pedal, without necessity for rockers or levers, which said pedal rod will work in eyes or guides at the back of the "key bottom." Page 420 TRADE JOTTINGS & NOTES We inadvertently, in our last issue, stated that Mr Kew, of Camden Town, had patented a new iron frame. We are infomed that this gentleman obtained provisional protection only, on the expiry of which no further steps were taken. It appears now that Mr Jules Gautier had previously patented an improved iron frame - the "equistrung" - and he further claims that he is the sole maker. We give this in explanation, and further refer our readers to a letter on the subject which appears in our "Essence" column, and to the complete specification which is printed elsewhere.
Occupation
Piano Maker
6 April 1891 (Age 60 years)

Citation details: Page 32 Schedule No. 238
Quality of data: 4
Residence 6 April 1891 (Age 60 years)
Citation details: Page 32 Schedule No. 238
Quality of data: 4
Newspaper Report
The Times
13 April 1898 (Age 67 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times on 13 April 1898 POLICE At Marlborough Street, yesterday, James Sullivan, 36, a rough looking man, described as a costermonger of Queen Street, Seven Dials, was charged on remand before Mr de Rutzen with having been concerned with others not in custody in attempting to steal from the person of Mr Jules Gautier, a pianoforte manufacturer of Great Titchfield Street; also with assaulting Mr Gautier by striking him in the side. Mr Gautier deposed that about half past 11 o' clock on the night of the 4th inst. he was knocked down while at the corner of Hampstead Road and Euston Road by two men, the prisoner being one of his assailants. While the prisoner held him down the other man attempted to rifle his pockets. An alarm hving been raised, the prisoner was captured, but the second man escaped. While on the ground the prisoner kicked him in the side. Warder Cook of Holloway Gaol, proved two previous convictions against the accused, one in March, 1886, when he was sentenced to five years penal servitude for uttering counterfeit coin, and the other in March 1892, when he recieved a term of seven years penal servitude for being in possession of housebreaking instruments. He was still "on licence." Mr de Rutzen committed the prisoner for trial.
Newspaper Report
The Times
20 April 1898 (Age 67 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in The Times Apr 20 1898 Page 3 COUNTY OF LONDON SESSIONS The April adjourned quarter sessions for the trial of cases arising on the north side of the Thames were opened today at the Sessions-house, Clerkenwell, before Mr McConnell, QC, Chairman Mr Loveland Loveland (sic), QC, Deputy Chairman, and other justices. The calendar contains the names of 78 persons charged with offences. JAMES SULLIVAN, 40, was indicted for assaulting Jules Gautier, with intent to rob him. Mr Hurrell was council for the prosecution. About 11pm on April 4 Mr Gautier, a pianoforte maker, was walking along Euston Road, when he was suddenly attacked by two or three men, who seized him from behind, threw him to the ground, and then felt in all his pockets. Mr Gautier seized the prisoner by his coat, and held on until a constable came up. The jury found the prisoner Guilty, and Warder Cook said he had been several times convicted already, had twice undergone penal servitude, and was now on a "ticket of leave." He was sentenced to five years penal servitude.
Newspaper Report
Reynolds's Newspaper
24 April 1898 (Age 67 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in Reynolds's Newspaper 24 April 1898 LONDON COUNTY SESSIONS FIVE YEARS FOR ASSAULT «i»James Sullivan«/i», 40, hawker, was convicted of assaulting Jules Gautier with intent to rob him. At eleven o'clock on the night of April 4, Mr Gautier, an elderly pianoforte manufacturer, was set upon by the prisoner and other men in Euston Road. They knocked him to the ground, kicked him, tore his clothes, and tried to steal his property. Some pedestrians witnessed this, and Sullivan was secured. He was recognised by Warder Cook as a man who had served terms of penal servitude, and was on licence at the time of his arrest. Detective-sergeant Scholes said that other old men had been attacked in a similar way and his Lordship sentebced Sullivan to five years penal servitude.
Advertisement
Jules Gautier, Pianoforte Manufacturer
1 November 1899 (Age 68 years)

Note: This advertisement appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st Nov 1899 on page 139.
Occupation
Piano Maker, Tuner
1 April 1901 (Age 70 years)

Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 126
Quality of data: 4
Residence 1 April 1901 (Age 70 years)
Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 126
Quality of data: 4
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review
1 June 1903 (Age 72 years)

Note:
Transcript of an item which appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st June 1903 on page 663 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER (Established 1866), Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, manufacturer of Perfect Scale Pianofortes, absolutely best value in the trade - willing to forward the originals of testimonials, also prices.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 July 1903 (Age 72 years)

Note:
Transcript of two items which appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st July 1903 Page 738 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER (Established 1866), Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, manufacturer of Perfect Scale Pianofortes, absolutely best value in the trade - willing to forward the originals of testimonials, also prices. Page 787 Mr Jules Gautier - who makes a piano on what we may term an out-of-the-beaten-track system - appears to be as busy now as he was during the winter.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 March 1904 (Age 73 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st Mar 1904 on page 478 TRADE JOTTINGS An upright grand of 4ft 4in high - styled the Introduction Model - made by Jules Gautier, was inspected by us the other day. It is a substantially constructed and good toned piano, retailing at twenty-four pounds. There is a through panel with marqueterie thereon, fluted trusses and mouldings on the top door as also on the lock board (and return); pilasters to match. The wrest plank is made up of three pieces, veneered with maple or sycamore. Mr Gautier also showed us his oblique, several of which pianos have been sent to Indian merchants, for whom the cases are screwed. The instrument is 4ft 3in high, and there is a three divided panel. The doors are made of solid wood, both having mouldings affixed. There is an all over frame, ivory keys, and it is claimed that the scaling is produced upon thoroughly acoustical principles. In connection with the construction of these models, the backs are morticed and tenoned and the bracings are dimensions 4½in by 3in (beam), both at top and bottom; the bridges are fitted on the bellies after the "barring" has been done, and screwed actions are used. The house was established in 1866. The advertisement appeared on page 483. This advertisement appeared in this publication regularly up until Sept 1905.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 April 1904 (Age 73 years)

Note:
Transcript of an item which appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st April 1904 Page 504 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER (Established 1866), Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, manufacturer of Perfect Scale Pianofortes, absolutely best value in the trade - willing to forward the originals of testimonials, also prices.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 May 1904 (Age 73 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st May 1904 on Page 643 TRADE JOTTINGS We are informed by Mr Jules Gautier that , having made a few pianos for extreme climates, he is now promised export orders to a considerable extent. Speaking on another subject - that of using a solid metal frame casting by which the wooden wrest plank is dispensed with - this maker claims that he has devised a method of action construction that will resist climatic influences. Hitherto, the manufacturer further tells us, actions have been a fruitful source of trouble to regulators residing abroad. It may not be out of place to mention here that Mr Gautier is anxious to secure larger factory premises, with room for the storage of timber.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 October 1904 (Age 73 years)

Note:
Transcript of an item in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st Oct 1904 on Page 6 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER buys for Manufacturing Purposes for cash and gives reliable value cheaper than the cheapest. - A customer writes "The excellent quality of tone in your pianos and genuine case work is an eye opener considering the price." - Note: a 4ft 4in upright grand piano for the price of a midget - ten years warranty - straightforward dealers only need apply; others save your stamps and my enquiries. - Grovedale Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, London, N.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 March 1905 (Age 74 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st Mar 1905 on Page 461 TRADE JOTTINGS The resourceful Mr Jules Gautier produces six classes of pianos, - vertical, overstrung and oblique. In a couple of his best models he fits the patent Stronghold frame, as also a Gehrling (screwed or tape) or a Brookes action if desired. But Mr Gautier's connection in the domain of "wonderland" lies in the fact that he continues to manufacture his Intrduction model, - in rosewood or in Chippendale style of wood. The piano is as high as 4ft 4in; the top door is moulded, the panel containing three compartments (there being marqueterie work in the centre one). There is a screwed action. With this low priced instrument (at twenty-one pounds) the maker - who has been establshed since 1866 - gives a ten years' warranty.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 April 1905 (Age 74 years)

Note:
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st Apr 1905 on page 544 «b»More Trade Jottings «/b»To improve the tone of his pianos and to make the case work attractive, appears to be the aim of Mr Jules Gautier, who produces a round dozen models. He has recently registered some neat designs for top and bottom doors which he uses in some of his instruments; and without extra charge as we are informed.
Newspaper Report
Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review
1 July 1905 (Age 74 years)

Note:
Transcript of an item in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st July 1905 on page 710 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER buys for Manufacturing Purposes for cash and gives reliable value cheaper than the cheapest. - A customer writes "The excellent quality of tone in your pianos and genuine case work is an eye opener considering the price." - Note: a 4ft 4in upright grand piano for the price of a midget - ten years warranty - straightforward dealers only need apply; others save your stamps and my enquiries. - Grovedale Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, London, N.
Occupation
Piano Tuner
28 July 1906 (Age 75 years)

Citation details: Page 6 Index No. 29
Quality of data: 4
Residence 28 July 1906 (Age 75 years)
Citation details: Page 6 Index No. 29
Quality of data: 4
Residence between 29 July 1906 and 14 July 1913 (Age 75 years)
Citation details: Page 6 Index No. 29
Quality of data: 4


Death 28 February 1914 (Age 83 years)
Address: n/a
Cause of death: Pneumonia and Arterio-Sclerosis
Citation details: Lewes 263
Quality of data: 4
Unique identifier
7C6C171664F94007BE5714714C74D5C9B193
yes

Last change 24 February 201617:51

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: 22 April 1824Caen, Calvados, France
1 year
elder brother
6 years
himself
19 months
younger sister
Mother’s family with Charles Michel HERBERT - View this family
step-father
mother
Marriage: 26 February 1840Caen, Calvados, France
Family with Appoline Euphrasie FAUTRAC - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 1854
1 year
son
22 months
son
4 years
son
23 months
daughter
5 years
daughter
2 years
daughter
Rosa Lizzie GAUTIER
Birth: 12 August 1869 38 337 Prebend Street
Death: 17 June 1948Hellenic Red Cross Hospital
3 years
daughter

OccupationRegistration of Birth
Citation details: Islington 84
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of first child Jules Paul Victor.
ResidenceRegistration of Birth
Citation details: Islington 84
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of first child Jules Paul Victor
ResidenceRegistration of Birth
Citation details: Islington 156
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of second child Jules Paul Victor.
OccupationRegistration of Birth
Citation details: Islington 156
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of second son Jules Paul Victor.
OccupationRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St. Pancras 384
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of third child Louis Charle Ernest.
ResidenceRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 384
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of third child Louis Charles Ernest.
OccupationRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 128
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of fourth child Emilie Pauline.
ResidenceRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 128
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of fourth child Emilie Pauline.
OccupationJules Gautier Business Letter Head
Quality of data: 4
OccupationRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 145
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of fifth child Marie Henriette
ResidenceRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 145
Quality of data: 4
Note: Residence at birth of fifth child Marie Henriette.
OccupationRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 161
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of sixth child Rosa Lizzie.
ResidenceRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 161
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of sixth child Rosa Lizzie.
Occupation1871 Census Camden New Town London
Citation details: Page 25 Schedule No. 159
Quality of data: 4
Residence1871 Census Camden New Town London
Citation details: Page 25 Schedule No. 157
Quality of data: 4
OccupationRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 41
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at birth of seventh child Pauline Victoire.
ResidenceRegistration of Birth
Citation details: St Pancras 41
Quality of data: 4
Note: Address at birth of seventh child Pauline Victoire
OccupationRegistration of Marriage
Citation details: St Pancras 98
Quality of data: 4
Note: Occupation at marriage of daughter Emelie Pauline to John Humphrey Wallis
ResidenceRegistration of Marriage
Citation details: St Pancras 98
Quality of data: primary evidence
Note: Address at marriage of daughter Emelie Pauline to John Humphrey Wallis.
Occupation1881 Census St Pancras London
Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 108
Quality of data: 4
Residence1881 Census St Pancras London
Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 105
Quality of data: 4
Occupation1891 Census St Pancras London
Citation details: Page 32 Schedule No. 238
Quality of data: 4
Residence1891 Census St Pancras London
Citation details: Page 32 Schedule No. 238
Quality of data: 4
Occupation1901 Census St Marylebone London
Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 126
Quality of data: 4
Residence1901 Census St Marylebone London
Citation details: Page 17 Schedule No. 126
Quality of data: 4
OccupationEntry Register French Convalescent Home Brighton
Citation details: Page 6 Index No. 29
Quality of data: 4
ResidenceEntry Register French Convalescent Home Brighton
Citation details: Page 6 Index No. 29
Quality of data: 4
ResidenceEntry Register French Convalescent Home Brighton
Citation details: Page 6 Index No. 29
Quality of data: 4
DeathRegistration of Death
Citation details: Lewes 263
Quality of data: 4
Immigration
Date as annotated in the registry entry for the French Convalescent Home, Brighton.
Occupation
Occupation at birth of first child Jules Paul Victor.
Residence
Address at birth of first child Jules Paul Victor
Residence
Address at birth of second child Jules Paul Victor.
Occupation
Occupation at birth of second son Jules Paul Victor.
Occupation
Occupation on Louis' birth certificate
Occupation
Occupation at birth of third child Louis Charle Ernest.
Residence
At Louis' Birth
Residence
Address at birth of third child Louis Charles Ernest.
Occupation
Occupation at 1861 Census
Residence
Address at 1861 Census
Occupation
Occupation on Emilie's birth certificate
Occupation
Occupation at birth of fourth child Emilie Pauline.
Residence
At Emilie's birth
Residence
Address at birth of fourth child Emilie Pauline.
Occupation
Establishment of piano factory from Business Letter Head
Occupation
Occupation at birth of fifth child Marie Henriette
Residence
Residence at birth of fifth child Marie Henriette.
Occupation
Occupation at birth of sixth child Rosa Lizzie.
Residence
Address at birth of sixth child Rosa Lizzie.
Occupation
Employing two men and one boy
Residence
From 1871 Post Office Directory of London
Occupation
Occupation at birth of seventh child Pauline Victoire.
Residence
Address at birth of seventh child Pauline Victoire
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in the Times 19 Nov 1872 Page 9 POLICE Robert Matthews appeared before Mr Mansfield in answer to a summons charging him with neglect to fulfill a contract. Mr W H B Pain, solicitor, conducted the prosecution. Mr C Chew of No 22 Piercefield Street, Kentish Town, pianoforte maker complained that the defendant had undertaken to complete some pianos, but after partly finishing four, he had refused to complete them, and absented himself from work from the 28th of October to the 1st of November and then said he had another place. He had drawn £5 more than was due to him for the work he had done. M. Jules Gautier, another pianoforte maker said the defendant had formerly been in his service, and he had been obliged to summon him. The complainant said he had been obliged to teach another man to finish the work. He had lost £20 by the defendants delinquency. Mr Mansfield ordered the defendant to pay £15 compensation and £1 3s. costs to the complainant, and in default of payment to be imprisoned for three months.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times Nov 4th 1876 Page 11 POLICE At WORSHIP STREET, MORRIS COHEN, 48, described as a general shipper and leather merchant , living in St Peter's Road, Mile End, was charged with having received a pianoforte which had been obtained by fraud. Mr B J Abbott, solicitor, appeared for the defence. The evidence showed that on Wednesday the 1st inst., a well dressed man entered the shop of Jules Gautier, pianoforte manufacturer, carrying on business in Camden Road, and selected a pianoforte. He stated that the pianoforte was required that evening, and therefore he would send for it himself. Soon afterwards a horse and van arrived and the man in charge handed to Mr Gautier a check for the price of the piano, the check being drawn on the London and County Bank, Lombard Street Branch, and was seen to take the piano to the prisoners house. The check given was afterwards found to be a forgery. The prisoner on being apprehended said it was true this piano had been left at his house, but he did not know who had left it. He also subsequently applied to the police for advice as to what he should do with it and threatened to turn it into the street. Waller, a detective of the K Division, who took the prisoner into custody, said that he had seen the piano in the house and also three other pianos. Mr Abbott said that the piano had been left at the house in the prisoner's absence, by whom he could only guess, and he was willing to give the police any information. The other pianos mentioned had been purchased by the prisoner in the ordinary course of business, and his checks in payment for them woul be produced. Mr Bushby remanded the prisoner and on the application of Mr Abbott allowed bail - the prisoner himself in £2000 and two sureties of £1000 each. The prisoner in default was locked up.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times 27 Nov 1876 Page 11 POLICE MORRIS COHEN, 48, shipper and leather merchant ,of St. Peter's-road, Mile End, was charged on remand with receiving, with guilty knowledge, five pianos which had been obtained by false pretences and by means of forged checks. Mr Wontner prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury; Mr Besley and Mr B. J. Abbott defended. Mr Wontner, it may be remembered, stated that the prisoner was a receiver of goods obtained by an organised gang of persons known as the "Long Firm." The prisoner was originally brought before the Court on a charge of receiving a piano which had been obtained by a man representing himself as "Harris and Co.," from Mr Gautier, manufacturer, of Camden-road. "Harris and Co." gave a check for £25 in payment, and the check when presented at the London and County Bank, Lombard Street, was pronounced a forgery of the bank form. The prisoner was subsequently charged with having obtained by similar means a piano from a Mrs Hardy living in Meyrick-square, and with having obtained three pianos by means of a check for £82 odd from the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company, these pianos being also found at the prisoner's house. In the latter case the pianofortes were delivered by the company at a shop in Windmill-street, Finsbury, which it appeared had been taken for the day only, and which after the check was discovered to be a forgery was found shut up. The prisoner carried on business in the Minories, and there, as well as at his house in St Peter's-road, a large quantity of property was found, comprising steam gauges, bicycles, sewing-machines, frying pans, &c, and much of this property formed the subject of charges now under investigation at the Mansion-house, and concerning which three persons are in custody. Mr Wontner said the prisoner would be included in the indictment with the others. The prisoner's own books showed that he had been dealing for years with known swindlers. The prisoner was fully committed for trial at the Central Criminal Court, an application by Mr Besley for bail being referred to a Judge at Chambers.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times 14 Mar 1877 Page 11 «b»CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT, March 13 «/b» THIRD COURT («i»Before Sir«/i» THOMAS CHAMBERS,«i» the Common Serjeant«/i».) Morris Cohen, one of "the Long Firm" so called, was indicted for a conspiracy to defraud. Mr Bulwer Q.C., with whom were Mr Dicey and Mr Mr Cowie, conducted the case for the prosecution; Mr Grain and Mr Tickell the defence. Pauline Gotier (sic), having been called as a witness, said, - I am the wife of Mr Gotier (sic), a pianoforte-maker. In November last I advertised a piano for sale in the «i»Daily Telegraph«/i», and I remember a person calling about the piano and asking to see it. My husband was going out at the time. I showed him the piano, whcih he did not like, and he chose one from the stock, the price of which was 26 guineas. He offered £25 cash for it, which I accepted. He said he would send for it, and that he was in the provision line in London-wall. He declined to leave a deposit, saying he would call and pay for it. He left, and shortly before 4 o'clock a van was drawn up to the door by two men. I opened an envelope which had been handed to me, and found a check in it. The piano was put into the van , which was in charge of two men, and they went away. I asked my son to follow the van. Louis Gotier (sic), a lad of 17, son of the previous witness, said he remembered the man Hart coming to their place of business and talking to his mother about the piano. Witness saw the piano taken away, having previously helped to put it in the van. Two men came for it, and there was a third near the house, whose manner aroused their suspicions. The van went as far as the College Arms, where it stopped; the two men went inside and four others came out, some of whom witness had seen on the bridge. On leaving the house all four got into the van and went a long circuitous route in the direction of the Hackney-road, where they entered the Devonshire Arms, and then went on, stopping at a place in the Minories, near Cohen's premises. Harris, who was with them, got down from the van and spoke to a man at a gateway. He got into the van again and drove down Whitechapel-road at a trot to St. Peter's-street, where Cohen lived. Witness stood at the opposite side of the street. One of the men got off the van and came and looked at witness very hard. The piano was taken through a gateway into a stable by three of the men who had got down from the van for that purpose. They first went to the house door, which was opened by some one from the inside. After the piano had been delivered the van went away, and witness followed. Two young women received the piano. Harris had joined the two men. Witness in the result went home and told his father what had become of the piano, upon which he and his father went to the place in London-wall, and found there was no one named Harris residing there. Witness's father brought a sergeant of police, on which the door was opened by a young man, to whom his father spoke; but the door was fastened by a chain from inside when shut. A man had previously come out and looked at witness with the sergeant, and had then gone in, shutting the door after him. They remained watching until 12 o'clock. Next morning, about 6 o'clock, witness went to the house and his father left. He and his father had been away a short time before 12 o'clock. Next morning he man who opened the door spoke to witness's father; at 7 his father relieved witness, who then went away. When Cohen came out he spoke to witness's father about having been watching all night. Witness remained there the whole day. Cohen came two or three times to witness, and, saying he looked cold, asked hime to heve a cup of coffe, which he declined. He then said to witness,"Come in and look at the piano and see if it yours." Witness went in and saw it in a bedroom on the ground floor. A man was sleeping in the room. Witness was told to take the piano away, the reason assigned being that it was no use his trying to catch men who were outof London by that time. About ten minutes afterwards the man returned with Harris and came to the street door. On seeing the witness they went in another direction, and witness followed them. He asked Harris if he was the man who bought a piano in Camden-road. He said he was not, and witness was mistaken. Witness replied that he was not, upon which he went away. At that time witness knew nothing about a check. Witness returned and remained until the evening, when the police came and took the piano away. Cross-examined by Mr Grain, witness said he recognized Harris at once. Being asked why he did not call a constable, he said he preferred to go himself for one. Before the men went to Aldgate they had gone to a place a few minutes' walk away from Cohen's private house, where all of them got into the van, which was then driven away. By Mr BULWER. - Witness at that time did not know whether the check was a good one or not. Mr Jules Gotier (sic), father of the previous witness, gave evidence for the prosecution, corroborating that of his son, adding that the prisoner denied all knowledge of a piano being brought there at all, upon which the door was shut in the face of witness, who heard it locked inside. Witness remained outside all night watching the place, his son rejoining him in the morning and remaining with him until about 8 o'clock. After that witness presented the check at the bank, where it was dishonoured, upon which he gave the prisoner into custody. He was afterwards told that if he did not take his piano away it would be turned out into the street. He replied that he was not there to watch the house but to look after his piano. The prisoner assured him that he was not a man to lend himself to anything of the kind, adding that his wife had foolishly taken in a piano for the evening on an assurance being given her that a warehouse were it was about to be placed had been closed for the night. The prisoner added that it was a "plant" on him by some wicked men to ruin him and that if he did not take his piano away he would turn it out into the street. Witness eventually said if the check turned out to be a bad one he should give him charge of the police. Upon that he called God to witness that he was innnocent, and that drink was ruining him. Witness, on going to the bank, found the check to be a bad one, and he gave the prisoner into custody. Police Inspector O'Callaghan was recalled, and said that on seeing the prisoner at the police station, and while the charge was being made, he declared he was innocent; that he knew nothing of the matter, adding that the piano was taken in by his daughter during his absence; That she was there and would tell them all about it. She then said two men brought the piano to their house in a van; that her father was then from home, and , ahving no instructions from him, she declined to receive it, not knowing what to do with it. The prisoner afterwards said to witness,"Mind, I don't know Harris and Co.; say I don't know them; at least I don't know them as Harris and Co." The prisoner afterwards lifted up his hands and called upon God to witness that he was innocent. Mrs Ann Hardy, a widow, residing in Merrick-square, spoke to a man calling on her, saying he understood she had apiano for sale, asking how much she wanted for it. She said eight guineas and he agreed to give it. Being asked how he was going to pay, he said,"Not by instalments;" he could pay 80 guineas if necessary, adding that he would send a man for it. He gave her his address A van or cart came in the afternoon with two men, and the prisoner, who was with them, gave her the check produced, upon which the piano was taken away. Next morning, on the check being taken to the bank it was dishonoured. She gave information to the police but heard nothing about her piano until she read a police report in the newspapers. Witness's daughter corrborated the evidence of her mother, adding that she asked the prisoner how he was going to pay the money. Evading the question, he said to her,"Do you think I want six months credit?" John Embly, a carman, spoke to a man having engaged him on the 31st of October, with his van, to remove a piano from Trinity-square, Southwark, to a house with the name "Cohen" on the door, and to two women there having taken it in. Mr William Barrett, connected with the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company, said he remembered on the 18th of September one Harris calling himself a general dealer, buying three pianos, which he said were for shipment, for which cash was to be paid. He selected three, and they were delivered in a van, one of the men present giving a check on the London and County Bank for £82 9s 9d It was taken to their banker's where it was dishonoured. Witness with a police inspector went to Cohen's premises in the Minories, where he saw his three pianos. He had never received anything in respect of them. The company took off 30 per cent. The price of each piano would have been £45. The cost to the trade was about £23 10s, but these were French pianos, with which the witness was not so familiar. Charles Hunt, a clerk at the London and County Bank, Lombard-street, said they had no account with Harris and Co., and the checks in question were not written on their form at all. He certainly considered those in question forgeries. They were all numbered alike - not consecutively. Thomas Channing, living at 5, Wentworth-road, Mile-end, said he had resided there six years and had not known any person named Harris or Hart living there, and no person could have used those premises for business purposes without his knowledge. Mr Washington Yarroo (sic - actually Yurrow), who had resided in London-wall for 21 years, deposed that he never knew anyone named Harris or Hart living there. If he had lived there he must have been his tenants, he being the landlord. Police-detective Waller siad he took Cohen into custody on the 2nd of November, and verified a statement he made when so arrested. This was the case for the prosecution, and Mr GRAIN addressed the jury for the defence, complaining at the outset that an article had appeared in the «i»Daily Telegraph«/i» of that morning on the subject-matter of the trial, contrary to all custom, he submitted, while the matter was «i»sub judice«/i». Mr Grain then addressed himself to the circumstances as they were elicited in evidence, which he reviewed in some detail, dwelling especially on the fact of the piano in question having been taken into the house by the prisoner's daughter, and upon his saying, when the circumstances came to his knowledge, that he knew nothing about the piano, and that it was a "plant" upon him.He referred to a number of checks he produced in court, and which had been given in payment of pianos. He asked the jury, in conclusion, to rise superior to prejudice on the occasion, and to acquit the prisoner. Miss Jane Cohen, a daughter of the accused, was called and proved that on the 1st of November a man came to their house who she did not know and said he had brought a piano for Mr Cohen to look at, and asked if she would take it in. Witness said she had no instructions to take it in, and she asked why he did not take it to the warehouse. He went away and returned in the evening, when witness was then in the house alone, and he told her he found the warehouse closed, that she had better take the piano in, and that he had had great trouble with it. Upon that two or three men and her servant carried it into the house, the men saying they would call in the morning about it. Her father came home towards 3 o'clock, and she told him what had happened as to the piano, upon which he was very much annoyed. He had previously cautioned her about taking in goods. Another daughter of Mr Cohen spoke to her father being very short sighted, and to her having to keep his books as a consequence. Mr Phillips and Mr Israel, both members of the Common Council, were called as witnesses to character, Mr Phillips stating that he had known the defendant ten years at least, and had always regarded him as a highly respectable gentleman, adding that he was so regarded also in the Ward which he , Mr Phillips, had the honour to represent in the Common Council. Mr Magnus and Mr Sapter corroborated the previous witnesses in that respect. Mr GRAIN, the prisoner's council, urged the jury to give him the benefit of any doubt they might have on the subject. Mr BULWER, for the prosecution, dwelt in very strong terms on the prisoners conduct in the transactions in question, which he recounted in some detail, observing in conclusion, that in cases of that kind, if the jury had any doubt on the subject, they ought to give the prisoner the benefit of it. The COMMON-SERJEANT then summed up the case to the jury, reminding them that it was one of receiving three pianos from the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company. He read the evidence in detail, leaving the jury eventually to say whether they were satisfied with the transaction as it came out in eveidence. It was, he said, beyond all controversy that the prisoner received the goods; but the question was, what did he know of the men? In a case like that under consideration, the offence was not in the actual receiving of the goods, but in the state of mind of the person when he did receive them. The jury then retired, and, after being absent about a quarter of an hour, returned into Court with a verdict of «i»Guilty«/i» on all the counts in the indictment. It was then stated by the prisoner's council that there was nothing else against him, and he dwelt on the bad state of health to which he was now reduced, consequent on his having been so long in prison. The COMMON-SERJEANT, addressing the prisoner, said he had very properly been convicted, though only on the counts for receiving, and he need not tell him that the prisoner was the worst of all the "Long Firm" gang, so called, the receiver being worse than the thief. As to the state of the prisoners health, that, of course, would attended to while he remained in prison. He was sorry to see a man commanding the confidence and respect of his friends, as he had done for some time, in state in which he now was. He sentenced him to five years penal servitude on the first indictment, and five years on the second.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times 19 May 1877 Page 13 POLICE At WORSHIP-STREET, ALFRED GLIDDON, stated to be the manager of the City Bank, Edgeware-road Branch; LEWIS LAZARUS of St. Peter's-street, Mile-end; and DAVID DANZIGER, of Tavistock-crescent, Kensal-town, appeared before Mr Bushby in obedience to summonses charging them with having conspired with other persons by unlawful and corrupt means to obstruct the due course of law and justice with intent to procure the withdrawal of certain charges of misdemeanour against Morris Cohen. Mr St. John Wontner prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury; Mr Poland and Mr Besley were for Gliddon, Mr Grain and Mr B J Abbott for Lazarus, and Mr Chapman, solicitor, for Danziger. Mr Wontner said that the man Cohen, who outwardly appeared to be carrying on the business of an exporter in Houndsditch, was in Novenber last indicted on more than one count at the Central Criminal Court for receiving a number of articles, all of great value, which had been obtained by a man named Francis, a ticket-of -leave man whose licence at that time was unexpired. The books of the defendant Cohen showed that the goods in question were obtained by Francis, and the police had taken possesssion of the books; the daughter of the prisoner Cohen must have known perfectly well that Francis would have to appear in the case. Francis, against whom a warrant was obtained, had, however, disappeared, and from the facts of the case against the present defendants, it was not unfair to suppose that Gliddon might be credited with having caused the disappearance of Francis. Cohen was originally brought before this Court on a charge of receiving a piano obtained from a Mr Gautier, by means of a fictitious check. The enquiries of the police in the matter led to discovery of the fact that Cohen had an account at the City Bank, Aldgate Branch, of whcih Gliddon was at that time the manager. Cohen was released on bail when his case first came before the Court, and while the police were making enquiries about the matter, and every day discovering that there were other cases against Cohen, the dfendants Gliddon and Lazarus were found visiting Mr Gautier's shop and offering, if he would withdraw from the charge, to pay him the price of the piano and all expenses to which he had been put. This, Mr Wontner in some detail said, had been done on several occasions, Mr Gliddon going to visit Mr Gautier in the intervals of remands in the face of the facts. By the publicity given and from his being present in court he must have known that the solicitor to the Treasury had been instructed to take up the prosecution, that on each remand fresh charges were being brought against the man Cohen, and that he was stated to be about to be indicted with persons who had been apprehended on warrants and against whom numerous charges of obtaining goods had been preferred. Mr Wontner did not wish to say anything against persons whose position, like that of Mr Gliddon or Mr Lazarus, was so respectable; but whatever their motives, whether they were actuated by more than friendship for the man Cohen or from interest, it was certain that they did commit themselves to an illegal agreement and combine in point of law, and as such had beeen guilty not only of an attempt to compromise a misdemeanour , but of a conspiracy in the terms set out in the charge. John O'Callaghan, Inspector K Division, said that while Cohen was under remand he saw Gliddon, who asked what witness thought of the case against Cohen. Witness, knowing of the other cases against Cohen, expressed the opinion that he would be convicted. Gliddon said,"You ought to think of his poor daughters and not press him so hard." Gliddon added that there were many others who had been doing what Cohen had done - buying of persons who had anything to sell without asking questions or making proper enquiry. It was, he said, a common thing in London. Witness told Gliddon that he had not come about Cohen but about Francis and asked for information. Gliddon said that Francis had been introduced to the bank by a customer, and they had made inquiries. He declined to let witness see those inquiries, remarking that it was not usual. Witness also inquired respecting a person named Kneiler, whose name appeared in Cohen's books. Mr Poland, on behalf of Gliddon, and Mr Grain on behalf of Lazarus, aplied for permission to reserve their cross-examination for the present. Mr Chapman had no questions to ask. Mrs Gautier, wife of Jules Gautier, pianoforte-maker, of 62, Camden-road, deposed to two men having on the 1st of November purchased at her shop a piano for £25, and they gave a check for the amount. The check was drawn in the name of Harris. The men removed the piano in a cart they brought, but witness, not feeling satisfied, sent her son to watch it to its destination. The check having been preented next day was returned, and her husband gave the man Cohen into custody. On the 9th, the day before the remand, in the evening, The defendants Gliddon and Lazarus presented themselves at the shop, 62, Camden-road. Gliddon told her he knew Cohen, and his family were all respectable, and that he had come to ask her husband not to prosecute. He asked if her husband had a solicitor. She said she thought so, but could not tell where they could find him. Gliddon had given her his card and said he was manager of the City Bank. He would prefer to see the solicitor as he could arrange it with him, and her husband need not attend the court. He asked her the price of the piano which had been taken, and when she told him he said, "Well we will buy it of him, and as your husband has been put to trouble during the week we will pay what expenses you have been put to." Gliddon went on to suggest that that if her hsuband was willing to arrange the matter it would be nothing out of his pocket. He, Cohen, had four daughters who were in great distress, and he asked her if she , as the mother of a family would not pity them. Gliddon added that he was certain Cohen was innocent, and had been the dupe of Harris, or words to that effect. Lazarus was in the room all the time. Gliddon said Harris was the one who should be punished. Witness said that she had heard that there were three other pianos belonging to the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company found in Cohen's place, and asked if her husband did not go to court, what about the other pianos? Gliddon replied that they would hear no more about them. They had settled four cases, and it would be all right. A day or two afterwards Gliddon called again and asked to see her husband, and said he wanted to arrangewith him not to attend the court, as he was certain that Cohen was perfectly innocent. She mentioned the name of Mrs Hardy, whom she had heard give evidence in the court the day before. Gliddon said they had had an interview with Mrs Hardy and she did not want to go on. In the evening they came again and saw her husband. On the 17th she found that the Treasury had taken up the prosecution. On the 23rd, while Cohen was still under remand, Gliddon, a Miss Cohen and the defendant Danziger came to her shop. Gliddon asked if they had received any subpoenas for next day, and when she said she did not know, he said that if they had not there was no necessity for their attending the court. They also said that if her husband would arrange the matter it would be a good thing for him, as Cohen was a large shipper of pianos, and he would deal with her husband. He added that he was ready to pay the £25 for the piano and the expenses of the solicitor, so it would be nothing out of her husband's pocket. Gliddon left and Danziger and Miss Cohen remained and saw her husband. The witness was not cross-examined, an adjournment being taken at the close of her examination in chief. Mr Wontner said he did not oppose bail. Mr Bushby, after some conversation upon the matter, fixed the bail for Mr Gliddon at two sureties in £1000 each and himself double that amount. Lazarus was ordered to find two bail in £250 each, and enter into his own recognizances in £500, and Danziger was ordered to give two sureties in £100 each and himself in £200. Bail having been given the defendants were liberated.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times 25 May 1877 Page 11 POLICE At WORSHIP-STREET, ALFRED GLIDDON, manager of the City Bank, Edgeware-road Branch; LEWIS LAZARUS, traveller, and DAVID ZANZIGER(sic), traveller, appeared to adjourned summonses charging them with having in November last consoired to defeat by corrupt means the due course of law and justice and to procure the withdrawal of certain charges of misdemeanour against one Morris Cohen, a prisoner then under trial, and to procure his discharge from custody. Mr St. John Wontner appeared for the prosecution on behalf of the Government; Mr Poland and Mr Besley defended Gliddon; Mr Grain and Mr B J Abbott defended Lazarus; and Mr Lee, solicitor, defended Zanziger(sic). Jules Gautier, pianoforte -maker, 62, Camden-road, said that on 1st of November, while he was away from home, a person who called himself Harris called there. There was then a piano in the shop. On his return the piano was gone, and a check signed "Harris and Co.," the address given being London-wall, was handed to him by his wife. Witness found also that his son was out watching the parties in possession of the piano, and he himself watched a house in St. Peter's-street, Mile-end, and saw a man whom he afterwards knew as Cohen. Later, on the 2nd, witness having presented the check, which was dishonoured, gave Cohen into custody for receiving the piano. He was charged before this Court on the following day and remanded until the 10th. On the night of the 9th witness heard from his wife that some persons had been there to see him. On entering the warehouse he saw the defendant Lazarus, who said,"Mr Gautier, I am come here on behalf of Mr Cohen, who is a friend of mine. I am sorry he has got into this trouble, and I can assure you he is a very honest and upright man." and witness replied,"You may say what you like about his honesty, but if my son had not followed the van I should have lost my piano." Witness told him that he was satisfied that both Lazarus and the friend who had come with him had only come for the direct purpose of compounding a felony. Lazarus refused to give him his name and address. The next morning, while witness was waiting in the neighbourhood of this court for the case of Cohen to be called on, the defendant Gliddon accosted him, and said that he wished to speak to him on behalf of Cohen. Witness asked Gliddon if he had called at his house the day before, and on his replying that he had, witness referred him to his solicitor, who was standing by. Gliddon then began to tell the solicitor that Cohen was a highly respectable man, that there were a number of City merchants ready to testify to his character, and that another charge made by the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company had been withdrawn in consequence. Witness's solicitor asked Gliddon what they wished done, and he replied,"Let him keep away. Do not let him appear at all." Witness's solicitor declined to advise that. Glidden said they would get Cohen remanded from week to week and then, as witness was left alone his case would fall to the ground. Witness's solicitor said they could make an application to allow the charge to be withdrawn. Gliddon said that would do. He did not want to do anything irregular. Then he walked away. In court witness heard an application made on behalf of Cohen to allow the case to be withdrawn, it being stated that the prosecutor desired it. That was not true. The police preferred another charge, and eventually the magistrate refused to allow the charge to be withdrawn. On the following Thursday the defendant Gliddon, with a Miss Cohen came to witness, the object of their visit being to get witness to go to Judges' Chambers and consent to Cohen being let out on bail. William Cook, housekeeper at 18, John-steet, Minories, deposed that some offices in that building were occupied by persons passing as Francis and Co. They left on the 9th of November suddenly and without notice. He had never heard of them since. Witness knew that large quantities of goods were frequently transferred form Francis's place to Cohen's warehouse in the Minories. Mr Wontner here remarked that the object of this evidence, for what it was worth, was to show that when the police had been to Gliddons bank on the 8th to make inquiries as to Francis and Co, who had been found dealing with Cohen, Francis and Co. with all their companions disappeared. Mr Bushby asked what inference he wished drawn fom the connexion of dates. Mr Wontner said that Gliddon connived at the escape of Francis and Co. The witness Cook added that Francis and Co. had, prior to the 9th, attended daily at their offices. Goods came daily and were removed, and goods came after Francis disappeared. Mrs Hardy, a widow, living in Meyrick-square, Southwark, deposed to a piano being obtained from her by Harris and Co., who gave her a check on the London and County Bank, Lombard-street. The check was subsequently found to be a forgery. The piano was found at Cohen's place, and she appeared against him. The defendants Gliddon and Zanziger(sic) called upon her and asked her to withdraw from the case, telling her she would not be the loser. The case was further adjourned for a fortnight, the defendants being liberated on the same bail as before.
Court
He gave evidence against Alfred Gliddon, Louis Lazarus and David Danziger who were charged with attempting to pervert the course of justice in the trial of Morris Cohen.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times 17 Nov 1877 Page 5 RELEASE OF A PRISONER Mr Alfred Gliddon, late manager of the Aldgate Branch of the City Bank, has been released from prison by order of the Home Secretary. On the 29th of June Mr Gliddon was tried at the Central Criminal Court, with Lewis Lazarus and David Danziger, on the charge of endeavouring to induce a person named Gautier to withdraw from the prosecution of a man named Cohen, connected with the "Long Firm," and since sentenced to ten years' penal servitude. Gliddon was committed for six months and Lazarus and Danziger for four months each. The inhabitants of West Drayton, were Mr Gliddon is minister of the Baptist chapel, joined in a memorial for the remission of the sentence, and on his arrival at the railway station he was met by members of his congregation and heartily cheered. During his imprisonment he was treated as a first-class misdemeanant.
Residence
Address at death of wife.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of an entry in the London Gazette dated 22 November 1878 on Page 193 The Bankruptcy Act, 1869. In the London Bankruptcy Court, In the Matter of Proceedings for Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by Jules Gautier, of No. 62, Camden-road, Camden Town, in the county of Middlesex, Pianoforte Manufacturer. Notice is hereby given, that a First General Meeting of the creditors of the above-named person has been summoned to be held at the offices of Mr W P Moore, No. 26, Bedford-row, in the county of Middlesex, on the second day of December, 1878, at two o'clock in the afternoon precisely. Dated this 16th day of November, 1878. W M PLAYTERS MOORE, Solicitor for the said Debtor.
Occupation
Occupation at marriage of daughter Emelie Pauline to John Humphrey Wallis
Residence
Address at marriage of daughter Emelie Pauline to John Humphrey Wallis.
Patent
Gautier, Jules (trading as Jules Gautier & Co), pianoforte manufacturer, of 172, Euston-road, London, for "Improvements in pianofortes." - Dated September 4th, 1880. 3600
Newspaper Report
Transcript of an entry in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review dated 1 Oct 1880 Page 27: Musical Inventions Patented England Application for Letters Patent Gautier, Jules (trading as Jules Gautier & Co), pianoforte manufacturer, of 172, Euston-road, London, for "Improvements in pianofortes." - Dated September 4th, 1880. 3600
Newspaper Report
Transcript of an entry in the Birmingham Daily Post dated 4 Mar 1881: NEW PATENTS (Contributed by Mr George Shaw) The following patents, amongst others, were sealed during the week ended March 3, 1881:- Jules Gautier, London, improvements in pianofortes. Dated September 4th, 1880
Newspaper Report
Transcript of three entries in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review dated 1Aug 1881:- Page 418 The Equistrung Vertical Iron Frame To the Editor: Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review SIR,--In the issue of «i»Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review«/i» for June appeared a paragraph to the effect that "Mr James Kew, music smith, of Camden Town, had just patented one or two improvements in the construction of vertical iron fame pianofortes, whereby the necessity of having breaks in the spacing of the springs is avoided." The following particulars in reference to the matter may be of interest to your readers, and may obviate very considerable misunderstanding. On enquiry at the patent office it will be found that Mr James Kew's so-called invention is dated November 15th, 1880, and had received provisional protection only, as he (Mr Kew) failed to give notice to proceed with his application; and letters patent have never been granted to him. My attention was drawn to this by my clients, Messrs. Jules Gautier & Co., of 172, Euston Road, who are the solemakers of the "equistrung vertical iron frame pianoforte" invented by Mr Jules Gautier, for which letters patent were granted, dated so far back as September 4th, 1880 (prior to the date of Mr Kew's application), in proof of which I enclose to you the official blue book of Mr Jules Gautier's specification. Trusting to your well known sense of fair play for the insertion of this letter, I am, Sir, yours obediently, WALTER A. BARLOW Agent for Messrs. Jules Gautier & Co. 6, St Paul's Churchyard, EC, July 13th, 1881 Page 419 New Patents and Inventions IMPROVEMENTS IN PIANOFORTES [JULES GAUTIER] This invention relates to certain improvements in or applicable to the manufacture of iron frame pianos, which improvements, in combination with old parts, constitutes a new or improved instrument; which, whilst giving a higher quality of tone and greater resisting power and strength to the construction of the piano, also considerably reduces the cost of production. The invention consists, first, in the construction in the iron frame for vertical pianofortes whereby the usual scale of keys and hammer-rail can be used , and obviating the "break" or "breaks" in the keys and the hammer rail which has hitherto been found necessary in all vertical pianos manufactured with the iron frame. This iron frame is constructed as follows:-The said iron frame is a casting, the pattern for which is made of an irregular plate with portions cut away for lightening the frame, and said plate acts as web for supporting the strengthening bars. The end of the frame at the "bass" end is strengthened by a bar of no special form, but convenient.The next intermediate bar is special, in so far as that the the length thereof upwards is reduced and run off to a feather, so that the head of such bar shall not interfere with the "action" or the wires, so avoiding the break as otherwise necessitated; and to compenstae for the reduced strength and length of the bar, a feather piece or projection is provided on the back of the plate of the frame at the back of the aforsaid bar. The next intermediate bar, as it is towards the treble end of the frame at the point of the greatest amount of strain of the wires, must be of great resisting power, but yet it must be narrowso as not to interfere with the wires, and therefore it is that I make it very deep or of considerable projection, and such projection in such position that it will come between the hammer and lever rails of the action, thereby avoiding the second "break". Strengthening feathers are also placed at the back of the plate and of the said bar. At the extreme feather end of the frame I carry up the end supporting bar to about the level of the top row of wrest pins, and also carry up the plate to about the same height, so that I can bolt the frame by this extra portion of the plate to the wrest plank and end support of the back, and this piece also acts as an abutment for the end of the down pressure bar at the bass end of the iron bridge, and just below the same a small portion of the frame is cut away - that is, a recess is made, into which the end of the wooden bass bridge is received and rests. As the wires have to be carried in a slightly oblique direction to pass the bars of the frame at that point, and the plank scale must nevertheless be so divided as to allow room for the wrest pins and tuning hammer, the down pressure bar is made with registered grooves, pins, or holes at the back thereof, so as to register and regulate the direction of every non-covered string of the pianoforte upon the smooth iron bridge of the frame, thereby obviating the irregularities caused by any irregular plank scale, a defect which is apparent in almost every iron frame piano; but this registering down pressure bar is generally applicable for keeping these wires of a pianofore in register; and it will be seen that the wires will from this construction be regularly in register without "breaks" and any ordinary action will be able to be used, thus saving the costs and imperfections of specially made actions. In making up the piano with this iron frame, the wires have to pass close to the bars of the frame, and thus the lower bridge pins which regulate the side "draught of the wires, have to come very close to the ends of the "belly-bridges", where there is consequently but little wood left in which said pins can hold; I therefore use what I call twin or triplet pins, these pins being made with a connecting head, the two or three pins thereof are driven into the bridge and support each other against the "side draught" of the strings; the importance thereof will be recognised by every practical man. Further, by this construction of the iron frame, the "back" of the piano can be made without intermediate bracings, thereby enabling the acoustician to do what may be desired with or manipulate as he pleases the sound board either for alterations for modifying the tone, or for addition of other instruments, in combination with the piano, which opens a large field for improvements, inasmuch as that thereby the same sound board is rendered accessible in every one of its parts. In doing away with the bracings, the "pillar bolts" cannot find bearing therein, therefore i Make provision for this by carrying bracing bolts through the framing with flat shanks, which are bolted over or under the intermediate rail of the key bottom, and through the iron plate, against which they are screwed up by means of the front and back nuts thereon, which nuts grip the iron frame through which the bolts are passed, one nut being on the front and the other on the back of the said frame. The end of the shanks of the said bolts are turned up, and take up position in a morticein the front rail of framing, so bracing the piano, and any provision for strength can be provided in the key bottom framing. The construction of the "back" of the piano consists of a beam which will be recessed into and be supported by two end supports and bottom bar, upon which said beam and supports the wrest plank is glued, as also is the back piece; and to further secure the beam to the supports, dowels are driven in from the sides through the supports and into bearing beam, thus providing a back of great strength. In this construction of piano, the usual methods of applying the "celeste" or mute pedal are not practicable, therefore I place and fix the celeste movement to the action frame by means of an upright central slide, whcih supports the celeste rail; the slide has therein slotted holes and screws are provided, one on the hammer rail and another on the lever rail, which screw passes through said slots, and so the celeste is readily applied and removed, and an elastic cord spring is employed to bring the celeste down when acted upon by the pedal; the ends of the celeste rail work in recesses in standards of the action. The pedal movement is in this case effected by an upright rod from the pedal, without necessity for rockers or levers, which said pedal rod will work in eyes or guides at the back of the "key bottom." Page 420 TRADE JOTTINGS & NOTES We inadvertently, in our last issue, stated that Mr Kew, of Camden Town, had patented a new iron frame. We are infomed that this gentleman obtained provisional protection only, on the expiry of which no further steps were taken. It appears now that Mr Jules Gautier had previously patented an improved iron frame - the "equistrung" - and he further claims that he is the sole maker. We give this in explanation, and further refer our readers to a letter on the subject which appears in our "Essence" column, and to the complete specification which is printed elsewhere.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times on 13 April 1898 POLICE At Marlborough Street, yesterday, James Sullivan, 36, a rough looking man, described as a costermonger of Queen Street, Seven Dials, was charged on remand before Mr de Rutzen with having been concerned with others not in custody in attempting to steal from the person of Mr Jules Gautier, a pianoforte manufacturer of Great Titchfield Street; also with assaulting Mr Gautier by striking him in the side. Mr Gautier deposed that about half past 11 o' clock on the night of the 4th inst. he was knocked down while at the corner of Hampstead Road and Euston Road by two men, the prisoner being one of his assailants. While the prisoner held him down the other man attempted to rifle his pockets. An alarm hving been raised, the prisoner was captured, but the second man escaped. While on the ground the prisoner kicked him in the side. Warder Cook of Holloway Gaol, proved two previous convictions against the accused, one in March, 1886, when he was sentenced to five years penal servitude for uttering counterfeit coin, and the other in March 1892, when he recieved a term of seven years penal servitude for being in possession of housebreaking instruments. He was still "on licence." Mr de Rutzen committed the prisoner for trial.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in The Times Apr 20 1898 Page 3 COUNTY OF LONDON SESSIONS The April adjourned quarter sessions for the trial of cases arising on the north side of the Thames were opened today at the Sessions-house, Clerkenwell, before Mr McConnell, QC, Chairman Mr Loveland Loveland (sic), QC, Deputy Chairman, and other justices. The calendar contains the names of 78 persons charged with offences. JAMES SULLIVAN, 40, was indicted for assaulting Jules Gautier, with intent to rob him. Mr Hurrell was council for the prosecution. About 11pm on April 4 Mr Gautier, a pianoforte maker, was walking along Euston Road, when he was suddenly attacked by two or three men, who seized him from behind, threw him to the ground, and then felt in all his pockets. Mr Gautier seized the prisoner by his coat, and held on until a constable came up. The jury found the prisoner Guilty, and Warder Cook said he had been several times convicted already, had twice undergone penal servitude, and was now on a "ticket of leave." He was sentenced to five years penal servitude.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in Reynolds's Newspaper 24 April 1898 LONDON COUNTY SESSIONS FIVE YEARS FOR ASSAULT «i»James Sullivan«/i», 40, hawker, was convicted of assaulting Jules Gautier with intent to rob him. At eleven o'clock on the night of April 4, Mr Gautier, an elderly pianoforte manufacturer, was set upon by the prisoner and other men in Euston Road. They knocked him to the ground, kicked him, tore his clothes, and tried to steal his property. Some pedestrians witnessed this, and Sullivan was secured. He was recognised by Warder Cook as a man who had served terms of penal servitude, and was on licence at the time of his arrest. Detective-sergeant Scholes said that other old men had been attacked in a similar way and his Lordship sentebced Sullivan to five years penal servitude.
Advertisement
This advertisement appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st Nov 1899 on page 139.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of an item which appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st June 1903 on page 663 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER (Established 1866), Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, manufacturer of Perfect Scale Pianofortes, absolutely best value in the trade - willing to forward the originals of testimonials, also prices.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of two items which appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st July 1903 Page 738 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER (Established 1866), Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, manufacturer of Perfect Scale Pianofortes, absolutely best value in the trade - willing to forward the originals of testimonials, also prices. Page 787 Mr Jules Gautier - who makes a piano on what we may term an out-of-the-beaten-track system - appears to be as busy now as he was during the winter.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st Mar 1904 on page 478 TRADE JOTTINGS An upright grand of 4ft 4in high - styled the Introduction Model - made by Jules Gautier, was inspected by us the other day. It is a substantially constructed and good toned piano, retailing at twenty-four pounds. There is a through panel with marqueterie thereon, fluted trusses and mouldings on the top door as also on the lock board (and return); pilasters to match. The wrest plank is made up of three pieces, veneered with maple or sycamore. Mr Gautier also showed us his oblique, several of which pianos have been sent to Indian merchants, for whom the cases are screwed. The instrument is 4ft 3in high, and there is a three divided panel. The doors are made of solid wood, both having mouldings affixed. There is an all over frame, ivory keys, and it is claimed that the scaling is produced upon thoroughly acoustical principles. In connection with the construction of these models, the backs are morticed and tenoned and the bracings are dimensions 4½in by 3in (beam), both at top and bottom; the bridges are fitted on the bellies after the "barring" has been done, and screwed actions are used. The house was established in 1866. The advertisement appeared on page 483. This advertisement appeared in this publication regularly up until Sept 1905.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of an item which appeared in the Musical Opinion and Musical Trade Review of 1st April 1904 Page 504 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER (Established 1866), Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, manufacturer of Perfect Scale Pianofortes, absolutely best value in the trade - willing to forward the originals of testimonials, also prices.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st May 1904 on Page 643 TRADE JOTTINGS We are informed by Mr Jules Gautier that , having made a few pianos for extreme climates, he is now promised export orders to a considerable extent. Speaking on another subject - that of using a solid metal frame casting by which the wooden wrest plank is dispensed with - this maker claims that he has devised a method of action construction that will resist climatic influences. Hitherto, the manufacturer further tells us, actions have been a fruitful source of trouble to regulators residing abroad. It may not be out of place to mention here that Mr Gautier is anxious to secure larger factory premises, with room for the storage of timber.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of an item in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st Oct 1904 on Page 6 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER buys for Manufacturing Purposes for cash and gives reliable value cheaper than the cheapest. - A customer writes "The excellent quality of tone in your pianos and genuine case work is an eye opener considering the price." - Note: a 4ft 4in upright grand piano for the price of a midget - ten years warranty - straightforward dealers only need apply; others save your stamps and my enquiries. - Grovedale Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, London, N.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st Mar 1905 on Page 461 TRADE JOTTINGS The resourceful Mr Jules Gautier produces six classes of pianos, - vertical, overstrung and oblique. In a couple of his best models he fits the patent Stronghold frame, as also a Gehrling (screwed or tape) or a Brookes action if desired. But Mr Gautier's connection in the domain of "wonderland" lies in the fact that he continues to manufacture his Intrduction model, - in rosewood or in Chippendale style of wood. The piano is as high as 4ft 4in; the top door is moulded, the panel containing three compartments (there being marqueterie work in the centre one). There is a screwed action. With this low priced instrument (at twenty-one pounds) the maker - who has been establshed since 1866 - gives a ten years' warranty.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of a report in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st Apr 1905 on page 544 «b»More Trade Jottings «/b»To improve the tone of his pianos and to make the case work attractive, appears to be the aim of Mr Jules Gautier, who produces a round dozen models. He has recently registered some neat designs for top and bottom doors which he uses in some of his instruments; and without extra charge as we are informed.
Newspaper Report
Transcript of an item in the Musical Opinion & Musical Trade Review of 1st July 1905 on page 710 Advertisement JULES GAUTIER buys for Manufacturing Purposes for cash and gives reliable value cheaper than the cheapest. - A customer writes "The excellent quality of tone in your pianos and genuine case work is an eye opener considering the price." - Note: a 4ft 4in upright grand piano for the price of a midget - ten years warranty - straightforward dealers only need apply; others save your stamps and my enquiries. - Grovedale Piano Works, Grovedale Road, Upper Holloway, London, N.
Shared note
Born in Caen which is in the Calvados department of Normandy, France. The incomplete translated transcript below is from the record of his birth provided by the Directeur des Archives Departmentales de Calvados. "On the 16th day of November 1830 at 10.00am the birth was certified of Jules Amand Eugene Gautier born yesterday at 9.00am son of Francois Gautier employed in the Mail Coach Service age 35 years 7 months and of Rose Eugénie Carpentier aged 27 years 7 months married and living in this town at 71 Rue St. Jean. The sex of the child is recognized as masculine by first Amand Jean Baptiste le Chartier, hotel keeper aged 54 living at 73 Rue de St. Jean, Caen. Second, Lemaire Francois stagecoach postman, aged 30 living in this town (address obscure). Upon the requisition to us made by the father of the child, was signed after reading. Gautier«tab»«tab»Le Chartier«tab»«tab»Lémaire Certified by Abel Leopold Frederic le Creps, deputy mayor acting as register official. Abel le Creps" He arrived in England in 1850. His first recorded occupation was as a French Polisher which appears on the the birth certificate of his first born. In 1866 he established a Wholesale Pianoforte factory at the Grovedale Road Piano Works. He had another works at Duncombe Road nearby. These roads are not far from Archway Tube Station but the two works no longer exist. The area has been extensively redeveloped for council housing. In 1876 he had a pianoforte shop and warehouse at Camden Road. During November he was involved in a court case against one Morris Cohen. Mr Cohen had received a piano bought from Jules' piano shop by a man calling himself Hart and using a cheque which turned out to be fraudulent. His wife Pauline had been supicious of Hart, and had their son Louis follow the van which collected the piano to see where it was taken. This action to protect their livelihood opened up a very large can of worms. Police investigating Cohen's premises found another four pianos along with a plethora of other goods. One of the four pianos had been fraudulently obtained from a widow, Mrs Hardy, using a similar ploy. The other three had originally been delivered by the Anglo-Continental Pianoforte Company to a shop which, it turned out, had only been rented for a day. Again a fraudulent cheque had been used. Police investigated more deeply, and the case turned in to a major one involving a gang called the "Long Firm". This labrynthine case went on for some months, was widely reported in the press, and resulted in over a dozen men being convicted of various fraudulent offences. This included three men who had repeatly visited Jules' premises and the home of Mrs Hardy. These three, along with Cohen's daughter, had vigourously, but without success, attempted to pervert the course of justice by trying to persuade the witnesses Jules, Pauline, Louis and Mrs Hardy not to appear in court against Cohen, saying all their costs would be covered. Cohen was convicted of receiving and was sentenced to 10 years penal servitude. On 27 July 1906, at the age of 76, he moved from 65 Bolsover Street, Regents Park, London to the French Convalescent Home in Brighton. The register of this establishment records him as being a Roman Catholic and having 5 children and a sister in Paris also with 5 children, one a girl. He stayed at the French Convalescent Home (Click http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Convalescent_Home,_Brighton for more information) until 14 July 1913 when, suffering from "derangement cerebral", he was moved to the workhouse for 5 days and then to the Brighton County Borough Asylum, Wivelsfield. He died there in March the following year from Pneumonia and Arterio-Sclerosis. Click here http://www.gautier.me.uk/MoviesGallery/MovieGallery.html to hear what a 130 year old Gautier piano sounds like today.
Shared note
(Medical):(1) Acute lobar pneumonia 6 days (2) Arterio-sclerosis P.M Certified by Charles Planck LRCP
BirthBirth RegisterBirth Register
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BirthBirth Register TranscriptBirth Register Transcript
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Note: French and English
OccupationJules Gautier Business Letter HeadJules Gautier Business Letter Head
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Note: In the absence of a family bible this business stationery seems to have been used by someone to record the Gautier genealogy. Subsequent research has proved it to be very accurate.
OccupationUpper Holloway 1878Upper Holloway 1878
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Note: The location of Grovedale Road and Duncombe Road are indicated.
OccupationA Gautier PianoA Gautier Piano
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OccupationGautier Piano LabelGautier Piano Label
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Note: Seems to indicate that he learned his trade working for Collard and Collard.
CourtMorris Cohen's Trial At The Old BaileyMorris Cohen's Trial At The Old Bailey
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CourtTrial Of Gliddon, Lazarus And DanzigerTrial Of Gliddon, Lazarus And Danziger
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Note: The account of the proceedings starts at the bottom of the first page
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Note: 1 March 1904
ResidenceFrench Convalescent Home Register EntryFrench Convalescent Home Register Entry
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ResidenceRegister Entry Transcribed And TranslatedRegister Entry Transcribed And Translated
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ResidenceThe French Convalescent Home BrightonThe French Convalescent Home Brighton
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